Tag: visions of saint Catherine of Genoa

How The Sufferings Of The Souls In Purgatory Are Coupled With Joy – St. Catherine Of Genoa. 

How The Sufferings Of The Souls In Purgatory Are Coupled With Joy – St. Catherine Of Genoa. 

How suffering in Purgatory is coupled with joy.

Know that what man deems perfection in himself is in God’s sight faulty, for all the things a man does which he sees or feels or means or wills or remembers to have a perfect life are wholly fouled and sullied unless he acknowledge them to be from God.

If a work is to be perfect, it must be correctly and carefully done in us but not chiefly by us, for God’s works must be done in Him and not done chiefly by man. Such works are those last work in us by God of His pure and clean love, by Him alone without merit of ours, and so penetrating are the and such fire do the kindle in the soul, that the body which wraps it seems to be consumed as in a furnace never to be quenched until death.

It is true that love for God which fills the soul to overflowing, gives it, so I see it, a happiness beyond what can be told, but this happiness takes not one pang from the pain of the souls in Purgatory. Rather the love of these souls, finding itself hindered, causes their pain; and the more perfect is the love of which God has made them capable, the greater is their pain.

So that the souls in Purgatory enjoy the greatest happiness and endure the greatest pain. The one does not hinder the other.

What Is The Highest Punishment Of Purgatory? And How Does It Differ From Hell? 

What Is The Highest Punishment Of Purgatory? And How Does It Differ From Hell? 

Separation From God Is The Chief Punishment Of Purgatory.

How Purgatory differs from Hell.

All the pains of Purgatory arise from original or actual sin. God created the soul pure, simple and clean of all stain of sin, with a certain beatific instinct towards Himself whence original sin, which the soul finds in itself, draws it away, and when actual sin is added to original sin, the soul is drawn yet further away. The further it departs from its beatific instinct, the more malignant it becomes because it corresponds less to God.

There can be no good save by participation in God, who meets the needs of irrational creatures as He wills and has ordained, never failing them, and answers to a rational soul in the measure in which He finds it cleansed of sin’s hindrance. When therefore a soul has come near to the pure and clear state in which it was created, its beatific instinct discovers itself and grows unceasingly, so impetuously and with such fierce charity (drawing it to its last end) that any hindrance seems to this soul a thing past bearing. The more it sees, the more extreme is its pain. Because the souls in Purgatory are without the guilt of sin, there is no hindrance between them and God except their pain, which holds them back so that they cannot reach perfection.

Clearly they see the grievousness of every least hindrance in their way, and see too that their instinct is hindered by a necessity of justice: thence is born a raging fire, like that of Hell save that guilt is lacking to it. Guilt it is which makes the will of the damned in Hell malignant, on whom God does not bestow His goodness and who remain therefore in desperate ill will, opposed to the will of God.

Source:

Treatise Of Purgatory By St. Catherine of Genoa.

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