“Worthy Of Believe” – Apparitions Officially Approved By The Holy See

“Worthy Of Believe” – Apparitions Officially Approved By The Holy See

A Roman Catholic approved Marian apparition is one that has been examined by the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith either based on certain criteria (which will be listed in our next article) and has been granted approval either through the local Bishop based on the direction of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith or received a direct approval from the Holy See.

Although a local bishop may provide a preliminary assessment (and allow the devotion to proceed forward), formal approval can only be provided after detailed analysis by the Holy See. For instance, although the apparitions at Our Lady of Laus were recognized by the local diocese in 1665, they received approval from the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith centuries later, in 2008.

While Catholics are not required to believe any private revelation, even approved ones, apparitions and messages may be approved by the Church for local or universal devotion. This approval is done for the benefit of the faithful, declaring “worthy of belief” those private revelations that can be helpful to Christians striving towards the ultimate goal of Heaven.

The Church is always careful to subject private revelations to a process of study before making any judgment as to the appropriateness of devotion, as it does not want to lead anyone astray from the faith.

Apparitions favored by the Holy See usually:

  • Images enshrined have received a Canonical coronation from a Pope.
  • Become the site of major Roman Catholic Marian churches, or elevated its status as Minor Basilica.

Some apparitions such as in Assiut, Egypt have been approved by the Coptic Church and can be called approved but not Roman Catholic approved.

Here is a list of private revelations over the past two centuries that have been found authentic and are approved by the Holy See for personal belief.

Apparitions Approved by the Roman Catholic Church.


Our Lady of Laus (1664–1718)Edit

The apparitions of Our Lady of Laus between 1664 and 1718 in Saint-Étienne-le-Laus, France, to Benoîte Rencurel, a young shepherdess are the first Marian apparitions approved in the 21st century by the Roman Catholic Church. The apparitions were recognized by the diocese of the Roman Catholic Church on September 18, 1665. They were approved by the Vatican on May 5, 2008. Currently, the site where the apparitions took place receives more than 120,000 pilgrims a year.

Edit

Our Lady of Guadalupe (1531)Ed

The 1531 apparition of Our Lady of Guadalupe was reported by Saint Juan Diego. He saw an early morning vision of the Virgin Mary in which he was instructed to build an abbey on the Hill of Tepeyac in Mexico. The local prelate did not believe his account and asked for a miraculous sign, which was later provided as an icon of Our Lady of Guadalupe permanently imprinted on the saint’s cloak where he had gathered roses. Over the years, Our Lady of Guadalupe became a symbol of the Catholic faith in Mexico and the Mexican diaspora.

Our Lady of La Salette (1846)Edit

The apparitions of Our Lady of La Salette were reported in La Salette in France in 1846 by two shepherd children, Mélanie Calvat and Maximin Giraud, followed by numerous accounts of miraculous healings. The Roman Catholic Church investigated the claims and found them credible.


Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal (1830)

The vision of Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal appeared to Saint Catherine Labouré in 1830 in the convent of Rue du Bac, Paris. She reported that one night in the chapel, the Blessed Virgin Mary appeared to her and asked that a medallion be made to a design that she dictated. The lady added that, “All who wear this medal will receive great graces. After spending two years examining her claims, her priest eventually took the information to his archbishop. The medal eventually produced came to be referred to as the Miraculous Medal. The front of the medal displays a picture of the virgin as she appeared to Catherine Labouré. The design on the reverse includes the letter M and a cross. Pope John Paul II used a slight variation of the reverse image as his coat of arms, the Marian Cross. This is a plain cross with an M underneath the right-hand bar, to signify the Blessed Virgin standing at the foot of the Cross while Jesus was being crucified.


Our Lady of Lourdes (1858)Ed

In 1858 Saint Bernadette Soubirous was a 14-year-old shepherd girl who lived near the town of Lourdes in France. Bernadette Soubirous was out gathering firewood in the countryside. She reported a vision of a Miraculous Lady who identified Herself as “the Immaculate Conception” in subsequent visions.

The Lady made a sign for me to approach; but I was seized with fear, and I did not dare, thinking that I was faced with an illusion. I rubbed my eyes, but in vain. I looked again, and I could still see the same Lady. Then I put my hand into my pocket, and took my rosary. I wanted to make the sign of the cross, but in vain; I could not raise my hand to my forehead, it kept on dropping”  “The Lady took the rosary that she held in her hands and she made the sign of the cross”.



Edit

Kibeho, Rwanda

On November 28, 1981, six young girls and one boy claimed to see the Blessed Virgin Mary and Jesus. The apparitions continued to members of the group until 1989. In 2001 the visions of three of the visionaries were confirmed as authentic. Our Lady’s message was that of repentance and an exhortation to pray the Rosary and Chaplet of Our Lady of Sorrows. Many believe one of the visions foretold the Rwandan genocide that occurred in 1994.



Banneux, Belgium

On January 15, 1933, it was claimed that Our Lady appeared to an 11-year-old girl named Mariette Beco. Our Lady declared to the girl, “I am the Virgin of the Poor.” She then pointed to a spring and said, “This spring is reserved for all the nations, to bring comfort to the sick.” By 1952 the apparitions were recognized by the Holy See as authentic. Many cures and conversions have occurred at these springs.

Fatima, Portugal

On May 13, 1917, three shepherd children, Lucia, Jacinta, and Francisco, witnessed a beautiful lady who asked them to come there on the 13th of the month for the next six months. They received many messages and visions from Our Lady and on October 13 a “miracle of the sun” was witnessed by a large crowd of people. The apparitions were approved in 1930 and then recognized by Pope Pius XII in 1940.


Knock, Ireland

On August 21, 1879, 15 people witnessed a silent apparition of the Blessed Virgin Mary, St. Joseph, and St. John the Evangelist. There was no verbal message from Our Lady of Knock, who appeared in a state of prayer. The apparition was approved by the local bishop and then recognized by Pope Pius XII in 1954.



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