Tag: Virgin Mary

The Sign Of The Cross And The Virgin Mary Saved 33 Chilean Miners From Death

The Sign Of The Cross And The Virgin Mary Saved 33 Chilean Miners From Death

Five years ago on October 13, the 33 miners who became trapped in a Chilean mine were brought to safety.

(CNN)When Chile’s San Jose mine collapsed on August 5, 2010, people around the world were fixated on the fate of the 33 miners trapped 2,300 feet underground.

The miners would end up spending 69 days below the Earth’s surface before rescuers brought them all to safety. As everyone celebrated the rescue of the 33 miners, many pointed to a higher power — a 34th miner — who they say was with them all along.

In the aftermath of the rescue, those involved have recounted seemingly inexplicable miracles during their time underground and credited God with protecting them. God, many of them say, was the 34th miner.

A comforting presence

Jorge Galleguillos, a miner from Copiapo, Chile, recalled making the sign of the cross in front of an image of the Virgin Mary that had been placed near the entrance to the mine. The miners asked her for protection every shift before descending into the lower levels of the mine.
The day of the collapse, like any other day, Galleguillos paid his respects to the Virgin Mary and headed into the mine.
During this particular shift, Galleguillos said he heard warning cracks but continued working. He recalled seeing something like a “white species … a butterfly” falling diagonally in the mine “like a paper.”

It was likely a bit of white quartz, but in local culture, a white animal is a sign that God is present.
As the mine began to rumble and dust filled the air, Galleguillos said he envisioned his 6-day-old grandson in his arms and his mother standing in front of him.
“I am not going to see my mother again. I’m not going to meet my grandson,” he thought.
Galleguillos said he is not particularly religious. Still, even as it seemed the worst was ahead, he said he felt God’s presence.
In the five years since the mine collapse, Galleguillos said he is more thankful than ever.
“There aren’t words to continue thanking God enough,” he told CNN’s Rosa Flores in a recent interview.

A rationing of resources

Alex Vega, a second-generation miner, had been suffering from a gastric ulcer for a couple of months when the miners became trapped.
As always, he had his pills in his backpack. Three of them. He divided them into four parts each so he could take a piece each day.
The fact that there was very little food only made his symptoms worse, and at this point, they had no idea when or if they would be rescued.
The miners ate one can of tuna per day, splitting each can between the 33 of them.
“You have to have faith,” Galleguillos said. “You can never lose your faith. Faith is nourishment … Faith is life.”

Faith, even without hope

Shift foreman Luis Urzua was the first person to be heard once verbal contact was made with the miners. His first words were, “We are well and hoping that you will rescue us.”
Urzua said he doesn’t believe in luck, but he does believe in faith — even when it seems like there is no hope.
“The devil couldn’t do anything because God was present,” he said.
Urzua recounted a time in the mine when one of his colleagues became ill. The prayers of the other miners, Urzua said, healed him.
“We made a prayer, we prayed in front of him,” he said. “The next day, he was better. … He was doing better than all of us.”
That power of prayer stayed with the miners throughout their time underground.
“When we prayed, we didn’t pray to get rescued; we prayed for the people outside not to abandon us,” he said.
It was another answered prayer.

Rescue resumes inexplicably

After weeks of drilling, the rescuers were getting closer to the miners. Then, the drill halted, just feet from reaching the miners. There was no forward or backward motion.
“It’s like, did we come this far and go through all this? And this damn thing is stuck here,” said Richard Soppe, a manager with Center Rock Inc.
Then, without any effort from the rescuers, there was a pop, and it started moving again.
Brandon Fisher, owner of Center Rock, led a team of drilling experts to help free the miners.
“I remember there was a loud bang on the backside of the control panel,” Fisher said. “Everyone just kind of stopped at one point in time and looked around.”

“We still don’t know what that noise was,” he said.
Ariel Ticona, a miner and expectant father at the time, said that when he heard the drill bit break through, he knew “that was by the hand of God that the miracle was done.”
While trapped, Ticona became a father to a baby girl, Esperanza, which means hope.
Jonathan Franklin, author of “33 Men: Inside the Miraculous Survival and Dramatic Rescue of the Chilean Miners,” said Esperanza’s birth was a miracle because she gave hope to the miners. She gave their dream of rescue a face.

Rescuing the miners

Chilean miner Osman Araya is welcomed by his wife, Angelica, after being rescued from the San Jose mine on October 13, 2010.
After much preparation and prayer, the final leg of the rescue began.
Florencio Avalos was the first miner to emerge. He was pulled to the surface in a 22-inch wide capsule.
Celebrations broke out, but the rescuers and miners faced the reality that 32 more miners needed the same miracle to live.
One after the other, they were rescued.
Vega said he hugged and kissed his wife like he was never going to let her go.
Ticona met his new daughter Esperanza in the hospital.

Urzua said God saved all 33 miners for a reason, but he’s been asking himself why since the rescue.
“Today, everywhere we turn, there is misery, hunger, terrible natural events,” Urzua said, speculating about God’s motive to rescue them. “We have to care for our environment, care for our children, so that they have a better life, we give them the best.”

After the rescuers returned home, they studied the science of the rescue.
“These tools should not have been able to bend and go around some of these curves. I mean, there’s no question in my mind that the faith of God, and the faith of the world praying for these guys to get rescued was a huge factor,” Fisher said. “Science, know-how, and will were applied, but at the end of the day, the big guy had everything to do with this rescue being successful. I believe that wholeheartedly.”

credit: thesplendorofthechurch

Another Sign? Residents Of Tonga Amazed At Miraculous Appearance Of The Virgin Mary In The Clouds

Another Sign? Residents Of Tonga Amazed At Miraculous Appearance Of The Virgin Mary In The Clouds

Has a sign of the Virgin Mary been seen in the heavens? Residents of the island nation of Tonga have photographed what they say was a miraculous, brilliant apparition that appears in photographs as a cloud.

The people of Tonga in the South Pacific have photographed what they believe is a miraculous apparition of the Virgin Mary in the sky. The apparition appeared in the clouds in the shape of Our Lady, but unlike the other clouds, it retained its form for some time. It also glowed more brightly than the other clouds.
mary appearance

The apparition was clearly dressed as Our Lady. The shape and form clearly showed a cloak, hands and feet, and a covered head. Stunned eyewitnesses photographed it several times.

The most likely explanation is that the apparition is a cloud, brightly lit by the sun at a particularly striking angle. However, this does not explain how the cloud retained its form or so long. The people of Tonga see clouds all the time, so the cloud had to be extraordinary for it to be photographed.
virgin mary appearance

It was also widely discussed on the island and is now making international news reports.

Skeptics will insist it was only a cloud, but for believers, it is yet another sign they are on the right track. It is important we pay attention to miraculous things, for the Bible tells us in Acts, “I will show wonders in the heavens above…”

Source: catholic.org

7 Great Reasons The Virgin Mary Wants You To Go To Confession Tomorrow

7 Great Reasons The Virgin Mary Wants You To Go To Confession Tomorrow

Confession is a gift that keeps on giving. Go early, go often and bring the kids.

At the Gregorian Institute at Benedictine College, we believe it is time for Catholics to imaginatively and vigorously promote confession.

But don’t take our word for it.

“The renewal of the Church in America depends on the renewal of the practice of penance,” Pope Benedict told us at Nationals Stadium in Washington.

Pope John Paul II spent his last years on earth pleading with Catholics to return to confession, including in an urgent motu proprio document about confession and in his encyclical on the Eucharist.

He called the crisis in the Church the crisis of confession and wrote to priests:
“I feel a pressing need to urge you, as I did last year, to rediscover for yourselves and help others to rediscover the beauty of the sacrament of reconciliation.”
Why all of this angst over confession? Because when we skip confession, we lose the sense of sin. The loss of the sense of sin is at the root of so many evils in our time, from child abuse to financial dishonesty, from abortion to atheism.

So, how to promote confession? Here are some talking points. Seven reasons to return to confession, both natural and supernatural.

1. Sin aggravates you.

A therapist tells the story about a patient who had been in a terrible cycle of depression and self-disgust ever since high school. Nothing seemed to help. One day, the therapist met the patient in front of a Catholic church. They ducked inside when it began raining, and witnessed people going to confession.
“Should I go too?” asked the patient, who had received the sacrament as a child. “No!” said the counselor. The patient went anyway, and emerged from the confessional with her first smile in years, and kept improving in the weeks to come.

The therapist studied more about confession, eventually became Catholic and now counsels regular confession for all her Catholic patients.
Sin leads to depression because it isn’t just an arbitrary violation of rules: It’s a violation of the purpose built into our being by God. Confession lifts the guilt and anxiety caused by sin and heals you.

2. Sin makes you aggravating.

In the movie 3:10 to Yuma, the villain Ben Wade says, “I don’t mess around with doing anything good, Dan. Do one good deed for somebody—I imagine it’s habit forming.” He is right. As Aristotle said, “We are what we repeatedly do.” As the Catechism puts it: “Sin creates a proclivity to sin.” People don’t just lie; they become liars. We don’t just steal; we become thieves.

Making a clean break from sin redefines you, allows you to start new habits of virtue.
“God is determined to deliver his children from slavery to lead them to freedom,” said Pope Benedict XVI. “And the worst and most profound slavery is that of sin.”

3. We need to say it.

If you break a favorite item belonging to a friend, you would never be satisfied just feeling regret. You would feel compelled to explain what you did, express your sorrow, and do whatever is necessary set things right.
It is the same when we break something in our relationship with God. We need to say we’re sorry, and try to fix it.

Pope Benedict XVI points out that we should feel the need to confess even if we aren’t guilty of serious sin.
“We clean our homes, our rooms, at least once a week, even if the dirt is always the same; in order to live in cleanliness, in order to start again,” he said. “Something similar can be said about the soul.”

4. Confessing helps you know yourself.

We get ourselves all wrong. Our self-opinion is like a series of funhouse mirrors. Sometimes we see a strong and wonderful awe-inspiring version of ourselves. Sometimes we see a grotesque and twisted hateful version of ourselves.
Confession is a gift that keeps on giving. Go early, go often and bring the kids.

Confession forces us to look at our lives objectively, separate the real sins from the bad feelings and see ourselves as we really are.

As Pope Benedict XVI put it: “Confession helps us to make our consciences more alert, more open and hence, it also helps us to mature spiritually and as human persons.”

5. Confession helps children.

Children need to go to confession, too. Some writers have stressed the negative aspects of childhood confession—being lined up in their Catholic schools and “forced to think of things to feel guilty about.”

It needn’t be like that.

Catholic Digest editor Danielle Bean once explained about how her brothers and sisters would tear up their confession lists after confession and drop them down the gutter by the church. “What a liberation!” she wrote “Returning my sins to the dark underworld from whence they had come felt wholly appropriate. ‘Hit my sister six times’ and ‘talked back to my mother four times’ were no longer my burden to bear.”

Confession can give children a place to unburden themselves without fear, and a place to get kindly adult advice when they are worried about speaking to their parents. A good examination of conscience (like this one) can guide children toward appropriate things to confess. Many families make confession an outing, followed up with ice cream.

6. Confessing mortal sin is required.

As the Catechism puts it, mortal sin, unconfessed “causes exclusion from Christ’s Kingdom and the eternal death of hell, for our freedom has the power to make choices forever, with no turning back.”
Over and over again in the 21st century, the Church has reminded us that Catholics guilty of committing a mortal sin can’t go to communion without confession.

“One commits a mortal sin when there are simultaneously present: grave matter, full knowledge and deliberate consent,” says the Catechism.

The U.S. bishops reminded Catholics about common sins that constitute grave matter in the 2006 document “Happy Are Those Who Are Called to His Supper.” Those sins include: missing Mass on a Sunday or holy day of obligation, abortion and euthanasia, any extramarital sexual activity, theft, pornography, slander, hatred and envy.

7. Confession is a personal encounter with Christ.

In confession, it’s Christ who heals and forgives us, through the ministry of the priest. We have a personal encounter with Christ in the confessional. Just like the shepherds and Magi at the crèche, we find awe and humility. And just like the saints at the crucifixion, we find gratitude, repentance and peace.
There is no greater accomplishment in life than helping another person return to confession.

We should be willing to talk about confession like we talk about every other significant event in our lives. The offhand comment, “I won’t be able to make it until later, because I need to get to confession,” can be more convicting than a theological discourse. And since confession is a significant event in our lives, it’s an appropriate answer to the question “What are you doing this weekend?” Many of us also have funny or interesting confession stories—tell them.

Help make confession normal again. Let as many people as possible discover the beauty of this freeing sacrament.

Source: catholicsay

Must Watch!! Moving Statue Of Virgin Mary Caught On Camera

Must Watch!! Moving Statue Of Virgin Mary Caught On Camera

Virgin Mary’s statue caught moving! Thousands have witnessed the Virgin Mary Apparition in Tapao, Vietnam. The statue moves. Her cloak floats and head turns. The Vietnamese government confirmed this event is true. See Video Below

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