Tag: Virgin Mary

Why Did Jesus Address His Mother, As “Woman” In The Bible?  

Why Did Jesus Address His Mother, As “Woman” In The Bible?  

Why is it that Jesus calls His Mother “Woman” in the Bible?

In few parts of the gospel, we noticed that Jesus addressed his Mother Mary as “Woman”. Many non-Catholics and protestants point to this fact in trying to downplay the importance of the Blessed Mother in Christian life. In fact, many of them seemingly use this to justify NOT giving the Blessed Mother the respect and veneration that Catholics give her.

Is Jesus being disrespectful of His Mother when He calls her woman? And as such, are we supposed to follow the Protestant “logic” that since Jesus called His Mother “Woman”, we should not give her as much honor as we should?

There are two (2) ways of answering this question.

First, does Jesus’ calling Mary “Woman” connote a certain level of disrespect? The answer, of course, is NO! Simple logic will answer this. 

Jesus, the Son of God, gave this as one of His principal commandments: “Honor your father and your mother.” Do you think that Jesus, who is God, will contradict Himself and not practice what He taught? That is, do you think that He Himself, who gave the command to honor father and mother, will NOT Himself honor His own mother?

Second, Jesus’ calling Mary “Woman” has a deeper theological meaning. Church scholars preach that the reason Jesus calls His Mother “Woman” is to refer to her as the “Woman” foretold in Genesis. In Genesis 3:15, after banishing Adam and Eve from the heavenly paradise, God made a promise to the serpent. He said that He will “put enmity between you and the Woman, between her offspring and yours. She will crush your head, and you shall bite her heel.”

At the very beginning of our salvation history, God promised to send a “Woman” whose offspring will crush the head of the serpent. That “Woman” is Mary, and the “offspring” is Jesus.

Whenever Jesus calls Mary “Woman”, therefore, He exalts her by pointing out to us that Mary is the fulfillment of the prophecy and promise that God made at the very beginning of human history. Mary is the “Woman” who will crush the head of the serpent! She is the victorious “Woman” who gave birth to Jesus, her Offspring, who triumphs over Satan.

Amazing! Real Madrid Players Offer Champions League Title To Our Lady

Amazing! Real Madrid Players Offer Champions League Title To Our Lady

 

They visited the Cathedral of the Almudena this Sunday to honor the patroness of Madrid.

Last Saturday, the Real Madrid football team won the Champions League for the 13th time. This wonderful team choose to celebrate in a unique way last Sunday by dedicating the title to Our Lady of Almudena, the Marian devotion venerated as the patron saint of the Spanish capital.

During the celebration in the cathedral of the patron saint of Madrid, the player Jesús Vallejo presented prayers to Our Lady on behalf of the whole team. The cup of the championship was offered to the Blessed Virgin by two other athletes of the champion club, Sergio Ramos and the Brazilian Marcelo.

It was the third consecutive time that the club won the league, this time beating Liverpool, United Kingdom, by 3 to 1, in a match played in the Ukrainian city of Kiev.

Back in Madrid, the champion team visited the Cathedral of the Almudena on Sunday, 27, where he was received by auxiliary bishop Jesús Vidal , representing Cardinal Carlos Osoro, Archbishop of Madrid, who was unable to attend.

Bishop Vidal told the athletes:

“Your example is important. Be witnesses that in life, to triumph, one must surrender, and this is the result of joint effort. You are an important testimony to young people. I encourage you to give good examples that will help make a world more supportive. Our Lady shares the joy of all the madrilenhos; share your joy.”

In turn, Florentino Perez, president of Real Madrid, said:

“This Madrid is a family. Values ​​are pillars in the pursuit of success.”

Virgin Mary Helps Police Officer Save The Life Of 3 Women

Virgin Mary Helps Police Officer Save The Life Of 3 Women

In 2006, Federick Yap was a new Fairfax County Police officer working the graveyard shift and looking for a place to file a report. He decided to pull into the parking lot of St. Thomas à Becket Church in Reston. 


“I didn’t realize I was in front of the Virgin Mary statue (and) I didn’t put any strong emphasis on it because being Catholic, it was normal for me,” he said. “And then I don’t know how it started and why it started, but I just offered a short prayer to the Virgin Mary and made it a practice (before every shift).”


Federick Yap was born and raised by his single mother in the Philippines, where he was baptized as a Catholic and attended Catholic school — He graduated from San Beda University in Manila, and moved to the United States in 1987. He got married and is the father of two children – a daughter in middle school and a son in college. The family attends All Saints Church in Manassas. For the past 12 years, he’s worked as a patrolman.  

Despite his Catholic upbringing, he never really considered himself very devout, nor did he have a lot of experience with praying the Rosary. But one memory from his youth has always lingered under the surface, even years later after he immigrated to the US in 1987. 

And it took some 20 years for him to discover why.

Every day after school he’d go running. His route took him passed his Catholic high school, where he’d usually stop to get a drink from the water fountain. As it was usually the same time each day, he’d always see one of the nuns, Sister Sophia, walking the hallway praying the Rosary. He would say hello, they would talk a little, and he would return on his run. Not a big deal. He couldn’t say why, but he always felt “close” to Sister Sophia after witnessing that, day after day.

Fast forward to Reston, Virginia, where Yap is now a police officer for Fairfax County. One night early in his police career, Yap pulled into the lot of St. Thomas Church  to park his cruiser and write up his reports — only to find himself parked in front of a faded statuette of the Blessed Virgin. He decided to offer up a simple prayer in three parts: one Our Father, one Hail Mary, one Glory Be. The habit became routine, always ending with “I love you, Lord, I love you, Mama Mary.” Eventually he began to pray the entire Rosary.

The Power of Three

Divine intervention often isn’t as dramatic and obvious as what is shown in movies; it usually happens subtly, quietly, and most often reveals itself only in hindsight — those without faith might even mistake it for coincidence or random luck.

It took Officer Yap many years to connect the dots over three separate incidents he faced while on the job. All three involved women in danger. And for him, it was no random coincidence.

The first incident was in 2011. The call was for a suicidal woman, according to an article in the Arlington Catholic Herald. When Yap and another officer arrived, they watched in shock as she drove her car into the Potomac River. Even though Yap wasn’t trained in water rescue, he and the other cop were able to get the woman out of the car to safety.

The second time was in 2015. Just starting his shift after the prayer, the call came in: a woman shot multiple times by her husband. A team of officers was able to get the injured woman out of the house safety, with Yap staying by her side, applying pressure to her wounds, all the way to the hospital, where she was treated and eventually recovered.

The third time was in 2016, according to the Arlington Catholic Herald report. He went to his prayer spot as usual, and when he finished he looked at the Holy Mother as her face appeared to convey to him, “I’ll see you later.” Shortly afterward, Yap responded to a call with another officer: a woman was in danger of harming herself. Arriving at her home, they approached the locked garage. Hearing two car engines running, they broke inside — finding the woman in her car, unconscious from the fumes. They opened the garage doors and dragged her from the vehicle. Yap swears that as he was administering CPR he saw the face of the Virgin Mother in front of him.

Significance of the statues

The theme of the “number three” came up in other various ways for Yap throughout the years, including in a trio of rosaries that were left on one of the statues at the church. But Yap did not connect the dots about his devotion and the three women he helped save until his work restoring a statue of the Blessed Mother.

MOTHER MARY STATUE
Federick Yap, a police officer for Fairfax County, kneels in front of a statue of Mary that he refurbished at St. Thomas à Becket Church in Reston. Yap begins every shift with a prayer in front of the statue.

Courtesy of Frederick Yap

As his devotion grew over the years, Yap took to repainting the faded statuettes of the Virgin surrounding the church in his spare time, even though he had no previous experience. But he didn’t make the connection between the Rosary, the three women he saved, and the statues until he was working on the third one.

“Three statues, three women that I saved,” said Yap, who is married with two children, a college student and middle-schooler. “Wow, it reminded me that the Holy Mother is there to watch us. She’s reminding me about the beauty of what I did for those three women. ‘Look what you are doing,’ she seemed to say, ‘you are making me beautiful’!”

Yap feels so grateful for rediscovering the rosary again, in a much deeper and personal way, so many years after meeting Sister Sophia in the hallway. While not everyone might have the same experience with the Rosary as Yap, he feels that everyone could benefit from making this habit a part of their daily life, whether at work or home.

MOTHER MARY STATUE

Courtesy of Frederick Yap

“Every day it gives me a better understanding about life, and it makes us kind,” he says. “We get the kind of energy that helps me to understand what ever we do, whatever we say, kindness and humility should be part of it.”

Yap believes Mary’s intercessions helped him – along with other police officers and medical professionals – to save the lives of three women during his time on duty, as each save occurred after prayer. “she is the protector of women”, he said. 

Did Jesus Visit His Mother First On Easter Morning? St. John Paul II Said ‘Probably So’.

Did Jesus Visit His Mother First On Easter Morning? St. John Paul II Said ‘Probably So’.

The Polish pope 21 years ago, had this to say about Mary as witness to the Paschal mystery.

The Filipino community has a whole celebration linked to the traditional belief that the Resurrected Jesus must surely have chosen to visit His Mother first, even before Mary Magdalene saw him at the tomb.

This belief was reflected upon by Pope John Paul II at the general audience of May 21, 1997.


We offer you his reflection to enjoy today (emphases in bold are our own):

~

1. After Jesus had been laid in the tomb, Mary “alone remains to keep alive the flame of faith, preparing to receive the joyful and astonishing announcement of the Resurrection” (Address at the General Audience, 3 April 1996; L’Osservatore Romano English edition, 10 April 1996, p. 7). The expectation felt on Holy Saturday is one of the loftiest moments of faith for the Mother of the Lord: in the darkness that envelops the world, she entrusts herself fully to the God of life, and thinking back to the words of her Son, she hopes in the fulfilment of the divine promises.

The Gospels mention various appearances of the risen Christ, but not a meeting between Jesus and his Mother. This silence must not lead to the conclusion that after the Resurrection, Christ did not appear to Mary; rather it invites us to seek the reasons the Evangelists made such a choice.

On the supposition of an “omission,” this silence could be attributed to the fact that what is necessary for our saving knowledge was entrusted to the word of those “chosen by God as witnesses” (Acts 10:41), that is, the Apostles, who gave their testimony of the Lord Jesus’ Resurrection “with great power” (cf. Acts 4:33). Before appearing to them, the Risen One had appeared to several faithful women because of their ecclesial function: “Go and tell my brethren to go to Galilee, and there they will see me” (Mt 28:10).


If the authors of the New Testament do not speak of the Mother’s encounter with her risen Son, this can perhaps be attributed to the fact that such a witness would have been considered too biased by those who denied the Lord’s Resurrection, and therefore not worthy of belief.

2. Furthermore, the Gospels report a small number of appearances by the risen Jesus and certainly not a complete summary of all that happened during the 40 days after Easter. St Paul recalls that he appeared “to more than 500 brethren at one time” (1 Cor 15:6). How do we explain the fact that an exceptional event known to so many is not mentioned by the Evangelists? It is an obvious sign that other appearances of the Risen One were not recorded, although they were among the well-known events that occurred.

How could the Blessed Virgin, present in the first community of disciples (cf. Acts 1:14), be excluded from those who met her divine Son after he had risen from the dead?

3. Indeed, it is legitimate to think that the Mother was probably the first person to whom the risen Jesus appeared. Could not Mary’s absence from the group of women who went to the tomb at dawn (cf. Mk 16:1; Mt 28:1) indicate that she had already met Jesus? This inference would also be confirmed by the fact that the first witnesses of the Resurrection, by Jesus’ will, were the women who had remained faithful at the foot of the Cross and therefore were more steadfast in faith.


Indeed, the Risen One entrusts to one of them, Mary Magdalene, the message to be passed on to the Apostles (cf. Jn 20:17-18). Perhaps this fact too allows us to think that Jesus showed himself first to his Mother, who had been the most faithful and had kept her faith intact when put to the test.


Lastly, the unique and special character of the Blessed Virgin’s presence at Calvary and her perfect union with the Son in his suffering on the Cross seem to postulate a very particular sharing on her part in the mystery of the Resurrection.

A fifth-century author, Sedulius, maintains that in the splendor of his risen life Christ first showed himself to his mother. In fact, she, who at the Annunciation was the way he entered the world, was called to spread the marvelous news of the Resurrection in order to become the herald of his glorious coming. Thus bathed in the glory of the Risen One, she anticipates the Church’s splendor cf. Sedulius, Paschale carmen, 5, 357-364, CSEL 10, 140f).

4. It seems reasonable to think that Mary, as the image and model of the Church which waits for the Risen One and meets him in the group of disciples during his Easter appearances, had had a personal contact with her risen Son, so that she too could delight in the fullness of Paschal joy.

Present at Calvary on Good Friday (cf. Jn 19:25) and in the Upper Room on Pentecost (cf. Acts 1:14), the Blessed Virgin too was probably a privileged witness of Christ’s Resurrection, completing in this way her participation in all the essential moments of the Paschal mystery. Welcoming the risen Jesus, Mary is also a sign and an anticipation of humanity, which hopes to achieve its fulfillment through the resurrection of the dead.

In the Easter season, the Christian community addresses the Mother of the Lord and invites her to rejoice: “Regina Caeli, laetare. Alleluia!” “Queen of heaven, rejoice. Alleluia!” Thus it recalls Mary’s joy at Jesus’ Resurrection, prolonging in time the “rejoice” that the Angel addressed to her at the Annunciation, so that she might become a cause of “great joy” for all people.

Source:

Aleteia

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