Tag: St. John Bosco

St. John Bosco’s Dream: The Snake And The Rosary And The Power Of Confession

St. John Bosco’s Dream: The Snake And The Rosary And The Power Of Confession

Saint Don Bosco: The Snake And The Rosary And The Power Of Confession.

I want to tell you a dream I had some nights ago, most probably on the eve of the Assumption. I dreamed that I was at my brother’s home at Castelnuovo d’ Asti with all my boys. While they were at play, a total stranger came up to me and asked me to go with him. He took me to a meadow alongside the playground and pointed to a huge, ugly snake, over twenty feet long, coiled in the grass. Frightened, I wanted to run off, but the stranger held me back. 

Get closer and take a good look,” he said.

What?” I gasped. “Don’t you realize that the monster could spring on me and gobble me up in no time?”

Don’t be afraid! Nothing of the sort will happen, just come with me.”

Nothing doing! Im not crazy!”

Then stay where you are,” the stranger replied. And he went to fetch a rope.

Take this end,” he said on his return, “and grip it tightly with both hands. I’ll hold the other end, and we’ll let it dangle over the snake.”

And then?”

Then we’ll snap it across its back.”

You must be crazy, the snake will leap up and tear us to pieces.”

Go on! Click it up to full size and give yourself a fright”!

“No, it won’t. Leave that to me.”

“Count me out! I have no intention to risk my life for a thrill of this kind!”

Again I tried to run away, but the stranger once more assured me that I had nothing to fear, because the snake would do me no harm. He talked so persuasively that I stayed on and agreed to his plan. He went around to the other side of the monster. We stretched the rope and then snapped it across the snake’s back. The monster immediately sprang up and struck at the rope, but as it did so, it ensnared itself as in a noose.

“Hold on!” the stranger shouted. “Don’t let go!” He ran to a nearby pear tree and tied his end of the rope to it. Then he came to me and tied his end of the rope to it. Then he came to me and tied my end to the iron grating of a window in the house. The snake kept furiously struggling to free itself, writhing, thrashing and flailing about. In its fury, it tore itself to pieces, scattering its flesh over the area, till it was slashed to a mere skeleton. The stranger then untied the rope and coiled it up, “Now watch very carefully!” he said as he put it into a box and closed it. By this time the boys had swarmed about me. Within a few moments he opened the box. We looked in and were astounded to see the rope shaped into the words Ave Maria – “Hail Mary.”

How did that happen?” I asked.

The snake,” the man replied, “is a symbol of the Devil, whereas the rope stands for Ave Maria, or rather, the Rosary, a succession of Hail Marys with which we can strike, conquer and destroy all of Hell’s demons.”

What followed is even stranger and more amazing.

Now, while taking with that stranger about the rope, the snake and what they symbolized, I turned around and saw boys picking up scraps of snake meat and eating them. “What are you doing?” I shouted. “Are you mad? That meat is poisonous.”

Its delicious!” They replied.

And yet no sooner had they swallowed it than they would crumple to the ground, and their bodies would swell and harden like stone. I was helpless, because, despite this, more and more boys kept eating that meat. I shouted and yelled at them, and even slapped and punched them, to keep them from eating, but in vain. For every one who crumpled to the ground, another took his place. Then I called the clerics and told them to go amoung the boys and do all they could to make them stop eating that meat. My order was ineffective; worse yet, some clerics themselves began to eat it and they too fell to the ground. Nearly out of my mind at seeing so many boys lying about me in such a pitiful state, I turned to the stranger.

What does this mean?” I asked. “These boys know that this meat will kill them, yet they eat it. Why?”

“Because ‘the sensual man does not perceive the things that are of God!’ That’s why!” He answered.

“But isn’t there some way of saving these boys?”

“Yes, there is.”

“What?”

“Anvil¹* and hammer.”

“Anvil and hammer? What for?”

“To put the boys back in shape.”

“You mean I am to put them on an avil and strike them with the hammer?”

“Look,” the stranger said, “this whole thing is a symbol. The hammer symbolizes Confession, and the anvil symbolizes Holy Communion. These are the remedies you must use.”

I went to work and found the treatment very effective, but not for all. While most boys were restored to life and recovered, a few did not, because their Confessions were bad.

¹*Anvil – a heavy iron block with a smooth face, frequently of steel, on which metals, usually heated until soft, are hammered into desired shapes.

Source:

Taken From ‘The Forty Dreams of Don Bosco’.

Raised From The Dead – How St. John Bosco Saved A Teenage Boy From Hell

Raised From The Dead – How St. John Bosco Saved A Teenage Boy From Hell


Saint John Bosco Saves Boy From Hell.

The usual snare with which the devil catches the young is to fill them with shame when they are about to confess their sins. When he pushes them to commit sins, he removes all shame, as if there were nothing wrong with it, but when they are going to confession, he returns that shame magnified and tries to convince them that the priest will be shocked by their sins and will no longer think well of them. Thus the devil tries to drive souls to the brink of eternal damnation. Oh, how many lads does Satan steal from God. (St. John Bosco).

If you prosper while in a state of mortal sin you are NOT BLESSED BY GOD, You have separated yourself from God. As God the Father revealed to St. Catherine of Siena, if a person in a state of mortal sin prospers materially on earth from their effort, He will allow it because He is just. And Satan will leave the soul in relative peace fearing that if he disturbs the spiritual slumber of the person they might repent and turn to God. The Evil One sits back and waits for the death of the person then claims his prize, their soul. God is merciful…when we repent.

‘We should all realize that no matter where or how a man dies, if he is in the state of mortal sin and does not repent, when he could have done so and did not, the Devil tears his soul from his body with such anguish and distress that only a person who has experienced it can appreciate it.’

-St. Francis of Assisi.

Raised from the Dead by St. Bosco

A fifteen year old boy in Turin was about to die. He called for Don Bosco, but the saint was not able to make it in time. Another priest heard the boy’s confession and the boy died. When Don Bosco returned to Turin, he set out at once to see the boy. When told that the boy was dead, he insisted that it was “just a misunderstanding.” After a moment of prayer in the room of the dead child, Don Bosco suddenly cried out: “Charles! Rise!” To the utter amazement of all present, the boy stirred, opened his eyes, and sat up. Seeing Don Bosco, his eyes lit up.

“Father, I should now be in Hell!” gasped the boy. “Two weeks ago I was with a bad companion who led me into sin and at my last confession, I was afraid to tell everything . . . Oh, I’ve just come out of a horrible dream! I dreamt I was standing on the edge of a huge furnace surrounded by a horde of devils. They were about to throw me into the flames when a beautiful Lady appeared and stopped them. ‘There’s still hope for you, Charles,’ she told me. ‘You have not yet been judged!’ At that moment I heard you calling me. Oh, Don Bosco! What a joy to see you again! Will you please hear my confession?”

After hearing the boy’s confession, Don Bosco said to the boy, “Charles, now that the gates of Heaven lie wide open for you, would you rather go there or stay here with us?” The boy looked away for a moment and his eyes grew moist with tears. An expectant hush fell over the room. “Don Bosco“, he said at last, “I’d rather go to Heaven.” The mourners watched in amazement as Charles leaned back on the pillows, closed his eyes, and settled once more into the stillness of death.

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