Tag: St. Elizabeth Portugal

How A Hermit Interceded For The Soul Of St. Elizabeth Of Portugal’s Daughter, Queen Constance In Purgatory 

How A Hermit Interceded For The Soul Of St. Elizabeth Of Portugal’s Daughter, Queen Constance In Purgatory 

St. Elizabeth’s Daughter Queen Constance in Purgatory.

After the death of her daughter Constance, Saint Elizabeth of Portugal learned the pitiful state of the deceased in Purgatory and the price which God exacted for her ransom. The young princess had been previously married for a short time to the King of Castile, when she was snatched away by sudden death from the affection of her family and her subjects. 

Elizabeth had just received these tidings, and set out with the King, her husband, for the city of Santarem, when a hermit, coming forth from his solitude, ran after the royal cortege, crying that he wished to speak to the Queen. The guards repulsed him, but the saint, seeing that he persisted, gave orders that the servant of God should be brought to her. As soon as he came into her presence, he related that more than once, whilst he was praying in his hermitage, Queen Constance had appeared to him, urgently entreating him to make known to her mother that she was languishing in the depths of Purgatory, that she was condemned to long and terrible suffering, but that she would be delivered if for the space of a year, the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass was celebrated for her every day. 

The courtiers who heard this communication ridiculed him aloud, and treated the hermit as a visionary, an impostor, or a fool. As to Elizabeth, she turned towards the King and asked him what he thought of it? “I believe,” replied the Prince, “that it is wise to do that which has been pointed out to you in so extraordinary a manner. After all, to have Masses celebrated for our dear deceased relatives is nothing more than a paternal and Christian duty”. 

A holy priest, Ferdinand Mendez, was appointed to say the Masses. At the end of the year, Constance appeared to St. Elizabeth, clad in a brilliant white robe. “Today, dear mother,” said she, “I am delivered from the pains of Purgatory, and am about to enter Heaven”. Filled with consolation and joy, the saint went to the church to return thanks to God. There she found the priest Mendez, who assured her that on the previous day he had finished the celebration of the three hundred and sixty-five Masses with which he had been charged. The Queen then understood that God had kept the promise which He had made to the pious hermit, and she testified her gratitude by distributing abundant alms to the poor.

Prayer For The Poor Souls.

My God! I recommend to Thee, the souls of my relations, my benefactors, my friends, and my enemies, and of those who are in purgatory on my account. I recommend to Thee the souls of evangelical laborers, of Religious and priests, and especially of those who had charge of my soul. I recommend to Thee the souls of those who were most devout to the passion of Our Lord, to the Blessed Sacrament, to the Sacred Heart of Jesus, and to the Blessed Virgin Mary, the souls who are most abandoned, those who suffer most, and those who are nearest to the entrance into paradise.

Eternal rest grant unto them, O Lord; and let your perpetual light shine upon them. May their souls and the souls of all the faithful departed, through the mercy of God, rest in peace. And may the divine assistance always remain with us and bring us to life everlasting. Amen.

How A Hermit Interceded For The Soul Of St. Elizabeth Of Portugal’s Daughter, Queen Constance In Purgatory 

How A Hermit Interceded For The Soul Of St. Elizabeth Of Portugal’s Daughter, Queen Constance In Purgatory 

St. Elizabeth’s Daughter Queen Constance in Purgatory.

After the death of her daughter Constance, Saint Elizabeth of Portugal learned the pitiful state of the deceased in Purgatory and the price which God exacted for her ransom. The young princess had been previously married for a short time to the King of Castile, when she was snatched away by sudden death from the affection of her family and her subjects. 

Elizabeth had just received these tidings, and set out with the King, her husband, for the city of Santarem, when a hermit, coming forth from his solitude, ran after the royal cortege, crying that he wished to speak to the Queen. The guards repulsed him, but the saint, seeing that he persisted, gave orders that the servant of God should be brought to her. As soon as he came into her presence, he related that more than once, whilst he was praying in his hermitage, Queen Constance had appeared to him, urgently entreating him to make known to her mother that she was languishing in the depths of Purgatory, that she was condemned to long and terrible suffering, but that she would be delivered if for the space of a year, the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass was celebrated for her every day. 

The courtiers who heard this communication ridiculed him aloud, and treated the hermit as a visionary, an impostor, or a fool. As to Elizabeth, she turned towards the King and asked him what he thought of it? “I believe,” replied the Prince, “that it is wise to do that which has been pointed out to you in so extraordinary a manner. After all, to have Masses celebrated for our dear deceased relatives is nothing more than a paternal and Christian duty”. 

A holy priest, Ferdinand Mendez, was appointed to say the Masses. At the end of the year, Constance appeared to St. Elizabeth, clad in a brilliant white robe. “Today, dear mother,” said she, “I am delivered from the pains of Purgatory, and am about to enter Heaven”. Filled with consolation and joy, the saint went to the church to return thanks to God. There she found the priest Mendez, who assured her that on the previous day he had finished the celebration of the three hundred and sixty-five Masses with which he had been charged. The Queen then understood that God had kept the promise which He had made to the pious hermit, and she testified her gratitude by distributing abundant alms to the poor.

Prayer For The Poor Souls.

My God! I recommend to Thee, the souls of my relations, my benefactors, my friends, and my enemies, and of those who are in purgatory on my account. I recommend to Thee the souls of evangelical laborers, of Religious and priests, and especially of those who had charge of my soul. I recommend to Thee the souls of those who were most devout to the passion of Our Lord, to the Blessed Sacrament, to the Sacred Heart of Jesus, and to the Blessed Virgin Mary, the souls who are most abandoned, those who suffer most, and those who are nearest to the entrance into paradise.

Eternal rest grant unto them, O Lord; and let your perpetual light shine upon them. May their souls and the souls of all the faithful departed, through the mercy of God, rest in peace. And may the divine assistance always remain with us and bring us to life everlasting. Amen.

How Attending The Holy Mass Prevented A Young Man From Dying

How Attending The Holy Mass Prevented A Young Man From Dying

Divine Providence never fails


ST. ELIZABETH was daughter of Peter III. king of Arragon, and granddaughter of James I, who had been educated under the care of St. Peter Nolasco, and was surnamed the Saint, and from the taking of Majorca and Valentia, Expugnator or the Conqueror. 

The queen (St. Elizabeth), had a very pious, faithful page, whom she employed in the distribution of her secret alms. A wicked fellow-page envying him on account of this favour, to which his virtue and services entitled him, treacherously suggested to his majesty that the queen showed a fondness for that page. 

The prince, who by his own sensual heart was easily inclined to judge ill of others, gave credit to the slanderer, and resolved to take away the life of the innocent youth. For this purpose he gave order to a lime-burner, that if on such a day he sent to him a page with this errand to inquire, “Whether he had fulfilled the king’s commands?” he should take him and cast him into the lime-kiln, there to be burnt; for that death he had justly incurred, and the execution was expedient for the king’s service. 

On the day appointed, he despatched the page with this message to the lime-kiln; but the devout youth on the road passing by a church, heard the bell ring at the elevation at mass, went in and prayed there devoutly; for it was his pious custom, if ever he heard the sign given by the bell for the elevation, always to go thither, and not depart till mass was ended. It happened, on that occasion, that as the first was not a whole mass, and it was with him a constant rule to hear mass every day, he stayed in the church, and heard successively two other masses. In the meantime, the king, who was impatient to know if his orders had been executed, sent the informer to the lime-kiln, to inquire whether his commands had been obeyed; but as soon as he had come to the kiln, and had asked the question, the man supposing him to be the messenger meant by the king’s order, seized him, and threw him into the burning lime, where he was soon consumed. Thus was the innocent protected by his devotion, and the slanderer was overtaken by divine justice. 

The page who had heard the masses went afterwards to the lime-kiln, and having asked whether his majesty’s commands had been yet executed, brought him word back that they were. The king was almost out of himself with surprise when he saw him come back with this message, and being soon informed of the particulars, he easily discovered the innocence of the pious youth, adored the divine judgments, and ever after respected the great virtue and sanctity of his queen.

%d bloggers like this: