Tag: Purgatory Stories

Help Rescue The Holy Souls From Purgatory 

Help Rescue The Holy Souls From Purgatory 

Help Rescue The Holy Souls From The Torments Of Purgatory.

“It is therefore a holy and wholesome thought to pray for the dead, that they may be loosed from their sins.” 

(2 Machabees 12:46).

Who is in more urgent need of our charity than the souls in Purgatory? What hunger, or thirst, or dire sufferings on Earth can compare to their dreadful torments? Neither the poor, nor the sick, nor the suffering, we see around us, have such an urgent need of our help. Yet we find many good-hearted people who interest themselves in every other type of suffering, but alas! scarcely one who works for the Holy Souls. When they are finally released from their pains and enjoy the beatitude of Heaven, far from forgetting their friends on earth, their gratitude knows no bounds. Prostrate before the Throne of God, they never cease to pray for those who helped them. By their prayers they shield their friends from many dangers and protect them from the evils that threaten them.

HAVING MASSES SAID FOR THE HOLY SOULS IS THE MOST POWERFUL TOOL THE CHURCH MILITANT HAS IN FREEING THEM.

Blessed Souls, I have prayed for Thee;

I entreat Thee, who are so dear to God,

and who are secure of never losing Him,

to pray for me a miserable sinner,

who is in danger of being damned,

and of losing God forever. Amen.

A Soul In Purgatory Begs For Masses.

Blessed Henry Suso, of the Dominican Order, made a compact with a fellow religious to the effect that, when one of the two died, the survivor would offer two Masses each week for his soul, and other prayers as well.

It so fell out that his companion died first, and Blessed Henry commenced immediately to offer the promised Masses. These he continued to say for a long time. At last, quite sure that the soul of his saintly friend had reached Heaven, he ceased offering the Masses.

Great was his sorrow and consternation when the soul of the dead brother appeared to him suffering intensely and chiding him for not celebrating the promised Masses. Blessed Henry replied with deep regret that he had not continued the Masses, believing that his friend must be enjoying the Beatific Vision but he added that he had ever remembered him in prayer.

“O dear Brother Henry, please give me the Masses, for it is the Precious Blood of Jesus that I most need!” cried out the suffering soul. Blessed Henry began anew and, with redoubled fervor, offered Masses and prayers for his friend until he received absolute certitude of his delivery.

Then it was his turn to receive graces and blessings of all kinds from the dear brother he had relieved, and very many times more than he could have expected.

How The Holy Souls In Purgatory Submit To God’s Will And How They Reproach The People Of The World – St. Catherine Of Genoa. 

How The Holy Souls In Purgatory Submit To God’s Will And How They Reproach The People Of The World – St. Catherine Of Genoa. 

Of the submission of the souls in Purgatory to God's will.
So intimate with God are the souls in Purgatory and so changed to His will, that in all things they are content with His most holy ordinance. And if a soul were brought to see God when it had still a trifle of which to purge itself, a great injury would be done it. For since pure love and supreme justice could not brook that stained soul, and to bear with its presence would not befit God, it would suffer a torment worse than ten purgatories.
To see God when full satisfaction had not yet been made Him, even if the time of purgation lacked but the twinkling of an eye, would be unbearable to that soul. It would sooner go to a thousand hells, to rid itself of the little rust still clinging to it, than stand in the divine presence when it was not yet wholly cleansed.
Reproaches which the souls in Purgatory make to people in the world.
And so that blessed soul, seeing the aforesaid things by the divine light, said: "I would be pleased or willing to send up a cry so loud that it would put fear in all men on the earth. I would say to them: 'Wretches, why do you let yourselves be thus blinded by the world, you whose need is so great and grievous, as you will know at the moment of death, and who make no provision for it whatsoever?'
"You have all taken shelter beneath hope in God's mercy, which is, you say, very great, but you see not that this great goodness of God will judge you for having gone against the will of so good a Lord. His goodness should constrain you to do all His will, not give you hope in ill-doing, for His justice cannot fail but in one way or another must needs be fully satisfied.
"Cease to hug yourselves, saying: 'I will confess my sins and then receive plenary indulgence, and at that moment I shall be purged of all my sins and thus shall be saved.' Think of the confession and the contrition needed for that plenary indulgence, so hardly come by that, if you knew, you would tremble in great fear, more sure you would never win it than that you ever could."
How The Holy Souls In Purgatory Appreciate The Charity Exercised For Them In The World Because They Are No Longer In A State To Acquire Merits – St. Catherine Of Genoa. 

How The Holy Souls In Purgatory Appreciate The Charity Exercised For Them In The World Because They Are No Longer In A State To Acquire Merits – St. Catherine Of Genoa. 

The souls in Purgatory are no longer in a state to acquire merit. How these souls look on the charity exercised for them in the world.

If the souls in Purgatory could purge themselves by contrition, they would pay all their debt in one instant. Such blazing vehemence would their contrition have in the clear light shed for them on the grievousness of being hindered from reaching their end and the love of God.

Know surely that not the least farthing of payment is remitted to those souls, for thus has it been determined by God’s justice. So much for what God does as for what the souls do, they can no longer choose for themselves, nor can they see or will, save as God wills, for thus has it been determined for them.

And if any alms be done them by those who are in the world to lessen the time of their pain, they cannot turn with affection to contemplate the deed, saving as it is weighed in the most just scales of the divine will.

They leave all in God’s hands who pays Himself as His infinite goodness pleases. If they could turn to contemplate the alms except as it is within the divine will, there would be self in what they did and they would lose sight of God’s will, which would make a Hell for them. Therefore they await immovably all that God gives them, whether pleasure and happiness or pain, and never more can they turn their eyes back to themselves.

Tales Of Purgatory – As Told By The Saints 

Tales Of Purgatory – As Told By The Saints 

Some fear it. Others hope for it. Some see it as proof of God’s mercy; others as testimony to God’s wrath. Many don’t know anything about it, while many more have forgotten what they once knew.

The “it” is purgatory, and when it comes to Catholic beliefs about the afterlife, the Church’s teachings on purgatory have long been among its most contested and misunderstood. 

Purgatory is More painful than anything on earth, and yet more peaceful than anywhere but Heaven. 

In her official teaching, the Church doesn’t say much about what Purgatory is actually like, but from the writings of the saints and theologians, there’s much we can learn.

1- It’s a place of intense suffering and joy:

St. Catherine of Genoa, who is said to have suffered the pain of purgatory on earth, claimed “there is in purgatory as much pain as in hell” (Treatise on Purgatory). Like the damned, souls there suffer hunger for the God they don’t yet see—like a man who could live without eating, hungering more and more for the bread he doesn’t have (to use St. Catherines image). And they suffer from fire that “will be more painful than anything man can suffer in the present life” (St. Augustine, On Psalm 37:3).

Once St. Catherine of Ricci is said to have suffered 40 days for a soul in Purgatory—when a novice touched her hand, she remarked, “Mother, you are burning!”

At the same time, St. Catherine of Genoa also taught, “Souls in purgatory unite great joy with great suffering … No peace is comparable to that of the souls in purgatory, except that of the saints in heaven.”

There’s a mysterious ebb and flow of pain and joy in Purgatory, says the Dominican Fr. Reginald GarrigouLagrange, because the suffering is temporary and leads to heaven: The more the soul loves God, the more it suffers not seeing Him; the more it suffers, the more joy and love it has in drawing closer to God.

2- It’s a place of cleansing and mercy: 

Remember the parable about the man who came to the king’s marriage feast without a wedding garment? (Matthew 22:114) The wedding garment is the life of grace we need to enter the feast of heaven. Now imagine a twist: The man comes wearing his garment, but it’s all soiled. What would the king say? Maybe something like: “Nothing unclean shall enter” (Revelation 21:27).

In the Old Testament, Judas Maccabeus had his men pray for the deceased and requested that a sin offering be made for them: “Therefore he made atonement for the dead, that they might be delivered from their sin.” (2 Maccabees 12:43). This presupposes a place of purification after death—Purgatory.

Many Church Fathers think St. Paul alluded to Purgatory when he wrote about building on the foundation of Jesus with gold or silver, wood or straw:  “The fire will test what sort of work each one has done … If any man’s work is burned up, he will suffer loss, though he himself will be saved, but only as through fire (1 Corinthians 3:13, 15). Wood and straw didn’t fare well for the three pigs—but God, in His mercy, doesn’t demand gold!

That’s a good thing, because Fr. GarrigouLagrange says, “Souls that completely escape all purgatory are probably rather rare. Among the good religious whom St. Teresa knew, only three had completed their purgatory on earth” (Life Everlasting., p. 194). 

3- It’s a place to avoid:

Nevertheless, it can be avoided, and the saints have repeatedly encouraged us to make our Purgatory on earth. 

Fr. Paul OSullivan gives the following advice for avoiding Purgatory (How to Avoid Purgatory): 

  1. Avoid sin
  2. Do penance
  3. Accept suffering
  4. Frequent confession and Communion
  5. Pray with faith and perseverance
  6. Prepare for death: “Eternal Father, from this day forward, I accept with a joyful and resigned heart the death it will please You to send me, with all its pains and sufferings.”
  7. Gain indulgences.

It’s advice that makes saints … even in this life. As Fr. GarrigouLagrange reminds us: Attaining sanctity on earth is possible—and normal—for everyone.

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