Tag: Prayers

Mary Embellishes Our Prayers And Good Works, And Adorns Them With Her Own Merit, So As To Be Pleasing To God. 

Mary Embellishes Our Prayers And Good Works, And Adorns Them With Her Own Merit, So As To Be Pleasing To God. 

Mary Embellishes our prayers And Good Works, And Adorns Them With Her Own Merit, So As To Be Pleasing To God. 

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St. Louis Maria De Montfort said, “when we present everything to Jesus by ourselves, and replying on our own efforts and dispositions, Jesus examines the offering, and often rejects it because of the stains it has contracted through self love, just as He rejected the sacrifices of the Jews when they were full of their own will.” (Ish. 64).

Meanwhile, Jesus instructed us, “If you are going to offer your gift to God and remember that you have something against your brother, keep your gift, go and reconcile with your brother first, before you offer your gift to God.” Now, what does this mean?

It means that our offering must be pure and spotless (Rom. 12:1).

St. Montfort clears the air by saying; “we must remark that in as much as our good works pass through the hands of Mary, they receive an argumentation of Purity and consequently of merit and satisfactory value. On this account they become more capable of solacing the souls in Purgatory and of converting sinners than if they did not pass through the virginal and liberal hands of Mary.

It may be little (Just One Hail Mary) we give to our Lady, but if that little is given with charity, self will, and purity of intention, that little becomes very mighty to turn away God’s wrath and draw down His Mercy.”

In Praying, Faith Is More Important Than Words. 

In Praying, Faith Is More Important Than Words. 

*In Praying, Faith is More Important Than Words*

(Homily for Tuesday 12th March 2019).

“And in praying, do not heap up empty phrases as the Gentiles do; for they think that they will be heard for their many words. Do not be like them, for your Father knows what you need before you ask Him” *(Matthew 6:7-8).*

As the saying goes, “empty vessels make the loudest noise.” A prayerful Christian is not necessarily a noisy Christian. The effectiveness of prayer is not in the number of words used, but the faith underneath every word.

In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus already told us to pray in secret so that our prayer is heard only by God who sees in secret. When we begin to shout and shakedown entire buildings, we not only draw attention to ourselves, we also display a gross lack of faith in the power of God who hears even the whispers of our mind.

In truth, when faith is lacking, we tend to use more words because it always seems to us that God hasn’t heard it enough or that God needs to be shouted at before He can take action. Jesus warns us today not to be like the Gentiles who heap up empty phrases.

*What is an empty phrase?* A meaningless combination of words or could it be what many often refer to as speaking in tongues? It is one thing to truly have the gift of the Holy Spirit, utterance, but a different thing altogether when you just make unintelligible sounds so that people would think you are speaking in tongues.

Before ever we set out to pray, we must first believe that the God we are about to talk to is more than able to do anything we ask. In this way, our prayer carries more weight even when we do not use many words. For instance, in today’s first reading, we hear God saying that just as the rain and the snow come down from heaven and do not return without first watering the earth, so is every word that comes from His mouth.”

This means, it really doesn’t matter how many times we repeat it, God’s words are “Yes” and “Amen” They must surely work. Those who believe in prayer know that every word uttered in faith works like magic, they don’t fuss like the prophets of Baal who were attempting to challenge Elijah.

In teaching us to pray, notice that Jesus makes use of intelligible and coordinated statements. Jesus did not speak in tongues. Jesus did not even repeat any phrase or statement. Jesus addresses God as our Father. He praises God, asks that His Will be done (not ours), He asks for our daily bread, forgiveness of sin and deliverance from evil/temptations.

The Phrase, *“Let Your Will be done on Earth as it is in Heaven” is one that teaches us to be truly humble and place our absolute trust in God’s direction for our lives.* Why am I always trying to give God specific instructions about my future and my life when in truth, God created me without even seeking my permission?

In the Lord’s Prayer, Jesus also makes us understand that prayer is never complete without the necessary corresponding actions on our part. That is to say, if I do not forgive those who sin against me, I am actually asking God not to forgive my own sins against Him.

It doesn’t matter how many words I use, if there is bitterness in my heart, if I cannot give to my neighbour what I am asking from God, my words at prayer carry no value. How can I be asking God for protection when I am silently wishing the death of my neighbour? How can I be asking for my business to prosper when I long to laugh over the collapse of my neighbour’s business? How can I be asking for satan to die when I exult him afterwards by living a sinful life? *Prayer is not just about words, it is Faith in Action.*

Let us Pray: Lord Jesus, deepen my faith in you that I may realize the need to use less, but only meaningful words in prayer and grant that my actions may not nullify for my prayers, Amen!

*Be Happy. Live Positive. Have Faith. It is well with you. God bless you. (Tuesday of the 1st Week of Lent. Bible Study: Isaiah 55:10-11, Psalm 34 and Matthew 6:7-15).*

Fr. Abu.

How Robert Kennedy’s Supporters Got Down On Their Knees And Prayed The Rosary After He Was Shot

How Robert Kennedy’s Supporters Got Down On Their Knees And Prayed The Rosary After He Was Shot

When presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy was shot in a California hotel on June 5, 1968, his supporters prayed…

“After Kennedy was shot at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles, many supporters got down on their knees and prayed the rosary. A famous picture from the time shows a busboy, Juan Romero, pressing rosary beads into Kennedy’s hands in the kitchen of the hotel. Imagine Catholics doing that today,” Mark Stricherz, political reporter and author of the 2007 book Why the Democrats are Blue, told CNA.

Kennedy’s own life had similar devotion. He was born the seventh of nine children to Joseph and Rosemary Kennedy in Brookline, Mass. After serving in the Navy during the Second World War, he married Ethel Skakel, with whom he would have eleven children – the last of whom was yet unborn at the time of his death.

Kennedy was often considered one of the more devout Kennedy brothers, with his house full of devotionals, bibles, and crucifixes, and regular prayer with his wife and children. He served as an altar boy as a young man and even at points during his career of public service, biographer Larry Tye said in his 2017 book Bobby Kennedy: The Making of a Liberal Icon.

Kennedy’s life also included some clashes with clerics, including an argument as a student with controversial Harvard Catholic chaplain Father Leonard Feeney.

In 1952 he served as manager for his brother John F. Kennedy’s U.S. Senate run. He was a Senate subcommittee staffer under U.S. Sen. Joseph McCarthy and would later write a report critical of his approach to anti-communism, according to the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum.


After managing his brother’s successful 1960 presidential campaign, he was named U.S. Attorney General. Following his brother’s 1963 assassination, he left the presidential cabinet and went on to run successfully for U.S. Senator from New York.


Kennedy entered the 1968 presidential race in mid-March, an event which may well have prompted President Lyndon Johnson’s announcement two weeks later that he would not seek re-election. Facing a primary foe in U.S. Sen. Eugene McCarthy, his campaign featured labor outreach to leaders such as Cesar Chavez and to African-American leaders such as Martin Luther King, Jr., despite his previous tensions with the Kennedy family.

For Stricherz, Kennedy’s 1968 electoral coalition was unique. He focused on working-class whites and blacks, which the senator called a “black-blue” or “have-not” coalition.

With the possible exception of Jimmy Carter’s 1976 victory, Stricherz told CNA, “no politician has pulled off that cross-racial, populist alliance of supporters.”


“To be sure, Bobby benefited politically from the death of his brother John, whom the country was still mourning. 1968 was a crazy year and many voters wanted a return to the stability of the early 1960s.”

Much like his president brother, Kennedy’s death with his life seemingly unfulfilled made him an object for the hopes of many who wanted a different path through the late 1960s and 1970s on war, race relations, and poverty.

It is possible the assassination changed the course of the country on abortion, Stricherz suggested. “Kennedy’s stand on the sexual revolution is unknowable,” he said.

Social conservatives have said a 1964 meeting he attended would have made him a supporter of abortion rights. But his sister Eunice was an unquestioned pro-life supporter who participated in the last great push to move the Democratic Party away from its abortion-rights stance in 1992. And Kennedy was the father of 11 children.”

Stricherz also doubted some depictions of Kennedy as a pioneer on racial justice.

“One reason President Johnson despised Bobby was he was ‘all hat no cattle’ on racial issues,” he said. “While Johnson passed more legislation to help blacks than any president, Kennedy made speeches. That said, no political candidate, not even President Obama, has attracted the adulation from black crowds that Kennedy did in 1968. But Kennedy sought to balance the interests of blacks and his white constituents. In a debate before the California primary in June 1968, Kennedy and McCarthy differed on the extent to which the federal government should support racial integration in housing.”


However, Kennedy’s April 4, 1968 remarks in Indianapolis upon the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. are sometimes credited with redirecting tension and anger over the killing. Indianapolis was among the few major cities to be spared riots in the wake of the killing.


Martin Luther King dedicated his life to love and to justice for his fellow human beings, and he died because of that effort,” Kennedy said in an African-American neighborhood that night.

For those of you who are black – considering the evidence there evidently is that there were white people responsible – you can be filled with bitterness, with hatred, and a desire for revenge. We can move in that direction as a country, in great polarization, black people amongst black, white people amongst white, filled with hatred toward one another. Or we can make an effort, as Martin Luther King did, to understand and to comprehend, and to replace that violence, that stain of bloodshed that has spread across our land, with an effort to understand with compassion and love.”


“For those of you who are black and are tempted to be filled with hatred and distrust at the injustice of such an act, against all white people, I can only say that I feel in my own heart the same kind of feeling,” Kennedy said. “I had a member of my family killed, but he was killed by a white man.”

Just months later Kennedy too would be fatally shot. His assailant, Sirhan Sirhan, a Palestinian Arab from a Christian background, was angered over Kennedy’s support for Israel.

Juan Romero, a 17-year-old Mexican busboy in the Ambassador Hotel, was shaking hands with the senator as he was shot. Romero cradled the wounded Kennedy in his arms on the floor of a hotel kitchen. He put his own rosary into Kennedy’s hands.

Kennedy lingered for about a day. He died early the morning of June 6, 2018 in the presence of his wife Ethel, two of his sisters, and a brother-in-law. He was 42.

Do You Have A Home Chapel? 

Do You Have A Home Chapel? 

An Example Of A Home Chapel


Is it permitted for members of the faithful to set up a chapel in their private homes?

YES. And I would like to encourage this practice, for those who can.

Of course, such chapels would NOT have the Most Blessed Sacrament in them.

I have been blessed to know several families that were able to set up beautiful chapels in their homes. For those who have the resources and the space, I heartily encourage this traditional practice. While the whole home should be a place where God is honored and loved, yet it can greatly help to have a special place set aside for this purpose. Many people accomplish this by having “prayer corners”, “prayer chairs”, “home altars”, and so forth. These are all good and holy things as well. But if you can set up a chapel? Even better.

Here is an example of one such home chapel:

Note the altar, the worthy crucifix, the candles, the kneeler (prie-dieu), and the relics. Of course, the sky’s the limit. Here is what one wealthy family in Rome built for their palazzoin the 1600s:

The sky truly is the limit for this sort of thing. And whatever is done, should be done for the glory of God and the edification of all who will visit the special place.

Now, there are some who will also scoff at this post: these people perhaps take an EITHER/OR approach to the Church and in matters like this presume that adorning a chapel (or even setting one up to begin with) basically involves depriving the poor. The money should be spent on the poor instead! I would encourage such people to read what St. John Chrysostom says on this matter. We can take a BOTH/AND approach! I have also written about St. Francis of Assisi’s approach to the furnishing of churches.

Finally, in our next post, we will share Father Jerabek’s address on the issue of serving God and the poor, not in competition with each other but in complementarity.

This article was originally published on Father Jerabek’s blog

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