Tag: Holy Mass

The Faithful Are NOT To Use the Orans Posture During the Our Father

The Faithful Are NOT To Use the Orans Posture During the Our Father

A discussion that is common in Catholic parishes between the more orthodox members of the parish and the more “progressive” members is whether or not the faithful should use the Orans Posture during the Our Father. When such a question comes up, the obvious solution is to go to the rubrics. Unfortunately, in this case, the General Instruction on the Roman Missal (GIRM) is relatively silent on the topic. Because of the GIRM’s silence, many people have taken this to mean that the faithful may do whatever they want. However, this is not the case. In the document, Instruction On Certain Questions Regarding the Collaboration of the Non-Ordained Faithful in the Sacred Ministry of Priests, put out by the Vatican on August 15, 1997, we read,

“In eucharistic celebrations deacons and non-ordained members of the faithful may not pronounce prayers — e.g. especially the eucharistic prayer, with its concluding doxology — or any other parts of the liturgy reserved to the celebrant priest. Neither may deacons or non-ordained members of the faithful use gestures or actions which are proper to the same priest celebrant. It is a grave abuse for any member of the non-ordained faithful to “quasi preside” at the Mass while leaving only that minimal participation to the priest which is necessary to secure validity” (ICP Practical Provisions 6 §2).

What the above statement means is that we may not say the Eucharistic prayers along with the priest — believe it or not, I see people mouthing the words along with the priest every week. More importantly to this topic, this also means the faithful may not use the same gestures that are reserved for the priest celebrant.

As mentioned above, the GIRM is silent with regard to the posture of the faithful during the Our Father, however, the Sacramentary (the book of prayers for Mass used by the priest) states that the celebrant is to pray the Our Father with hands extended. Looking back at ICP, the faithful are NOT to use gestures or actions proper to the priest celebrant. Using this argument, one would think that the rubrics could be used to appeal to the faithful. Unfortunately, many of the faithful view the rubrics as another set of rules and those of us who wish to enforce the rubrics are no better than the Pharisees.

In that regard, let us look instead to another reason why the Orans Posture (and subsequently, holding hands) is not an appropriate gesture for the faithful during the Our Father. The Our Father takes place during the Liturgy of the Eucharist. This time of prayer and offering is directed to God (as is the entire Mass, but more specifically during the Liturgy of the Eucharist). As it is directed toward God, the extending and/or holding of hands creates a horizontal emphasis on the prayer, as opposed to the vertical emphasis that it demands. Many people who prefer hand holding or the Orans Posture argue that the Our Fatheris a community prayer, and as such holding and/or extending hands is a visible sign of that community. However, the Our Father is a community prayer, not because we hold or extend our hands, but because we pray it together as the Body of Christ.

On September 3, 1958 the Sacred Congregation for Rites issued a document titled De musica sacra et sacra liturgia(Instruction on Sacred Music and Sacred Liturgy). This document stated, “Since the Pater Noster is a fitting, and ancient prayer of preparation for Communion, the entire congregation may recite this prayer in unison with the priest in low Masses; the Amen at the end is to be said by all” (DM Prayers and Hymns § 32).

It was at this time that the faithful were given permission to pray the Our Father with the priest. However, the faithful maintained the same posture as before – standing, with their hands folded in prayer. Prior to this Instruction, the priest prayed the Our Father on behalf of the faithful. The Orans Posture is representative of praying on behalf of others. The next time you are at Mass, watch the priest’s gestures closely. Anytime he offers prayers on behalf of the faithful, he uses the Orans Posture. Anytime he is offering other prayers, his hands are folded together. Having a better understanding of what particular gestures mean will lead to a better understanding of the Liturgy.

American journalist Hunter S. Thompson was dead on when he said, “Anything worth doing, is worth doing right.” We are talking about the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass here. The Eucharist, “the source and summit of the Christian Life” (LG 11) is consecrated here. Jesus Christ, the King of Kings and the Lord of Lords makes Himself present during the Mass. It is of the utmost importance that we treat the Mass with the respect it deserves. This is not the time nor the place to get creative and inject one’s own style and preferences.

Source: Catholic365

God Never Fails.

God Never Fails.

*🎷God Never Fails.🎷*

Homily for Wednesday 12th December 2018.

_“Even youths shall faint and be weary, and young men shall fall exhausted; but they who wait for the LORD shall renew their strength, they shall mount up with wings like eagles, they shall run and not be weary, they shall walk and not faint.” *Isaiah 40:30-31.*_

In today’s first reading, God seeks to reveal Himself to the prophet Isaiah. When we are trying to describe something entirely new to someone, we often resort to comparisons so that the person can use the idea of what he knows already to understand what he does not know. So God says to Isaiah, “To whom then will you compare me, that I should be like him?” This is a really tough question because in truth, there is nothing we use to compare God.

Nevertheless, in the course of that passage, God came up with an answer: “The Lord is the everlasting God, the Creator of the ends of the earth. He does not faint or grows weary… He gives the power to faint… Even youths shall faint and be weary, young men shall fall exhausted but they who wait for the Lord shall… run and never be weary, they shall walk and not faint.”

Only God deserves our complete trust. If God is for us, nothing can harm us. God’s power can never reduce, His strength is everlasting. If we place our trust in God and wait on Him, we shall be like eagles, we shall be victorious, we shall have the last laugh.

This fact is exactly what Jesus re-echoes in today’s Gospel passage: “Come to me all you who labour and heavy laden, and I will give you rest… for I am gentle and lowly in heart, and you will find rest for your souls.” 

If we place our trust in God and cast all our fears, worries and troubles (heavy burdens) on Him, we shall mount up wings be like eagles, we shall run and never be tired, walk and never grow faint. We shall be victorious, we shall have the last laugh.

My dear brothers and sisters, what is your burden? Jesus is saying to us today, “Come to Me.” How would you feel if the President of this country tells you, “come and see me?” Happy and hopeful, right? So why are you still troubled? Jesus is the one saying: “Come to Me.” Go and drop the matter right at his feet and let Jesus do what He alone knows how to do best.

_*Sing:*_

What a Friend we have in Jesus.

all our sins and griefs to bear!

What a privilege to carry.

everything to God in prayer!
O what peace we often forfeit,

O what needless pain we bear,

All because we do not carry

everything to God in prayer.

*Let us Pray: Lord Jesus, I trust you and I know you will never fail me. Amen.*

Be Happy. Live Positive. Have Faith. It is well with you. God bless you. 

Wednesday of the 2nd Week of Advent.

*Bible Study: Isaiah 40:25-31, Psalm 103:1-4.8.10 and Matthew 11:28-30*.

-Fr. Evaristus Abu🎺



Why Do Catholic Priests Kiss The Altar At The Beginning Of A Mass?

Why Do Catholic Priests Kiss The Altar At The Beginning Of A Mass?

 

Why Priests Kiss the Altar at the Beginning of a Mass.



The practice of reverencing the altar with a kiss is one of the most ancient liturgical traditions and can be dated back to the 4 th century with certainty. 



The Roman Catholic Mass begins with the procession. Each member genuflects at the altar, and the priest and deacon kiss the altar in an act of veneration.

The Altar of Sacrifice.

In Roman Catholicism, the altar is both the sacrificial table and the place where the paschal feast takes place. During the first centuries of Christianity, when the Eucharist was still illegal, Christian altars were constructed from wood and often resembled ordinary house tables. This practise continued until the Middle Ages when, in 517, the provincial council of Epeaune in France decreed that altars should be made of stone to signify “Christ Jesus himself being the cornerstone” of Catholicism. Venerated relics were conserved in cavities in the stone altars of newly built Basilicas, which were then placed directly above the tomb of a martyr to evoke those times during the persecutions of the church when martyrs’ tombs were utilized as places of Eucharistic celebration.

In Remembrance of Me.

The Eucharist is housed in the Tabernacle, which is present in the sanctuary. It is customary to genuflect in reverence to the Tabernacle when entering the sanctuary. According to Catholicism, Jesus Christ established the Holy Eucharist prior to his death on the cross by informing the twelve apostles to “do this in remembrance of me.” The Eucharist involves the Roman Catholic concept of Transubstantiation: the bread and wine take on the substance of Christ, maintaining their literal taste and appearance while becoming, in essence, his body and blood.

The Altar.

An act of veneration, the holy kiss, or kiss of peace, occurs three times during the Mass, the first of which is at the altar. Like the cross on Calvary, where the Bible says that Jesus Christ sacrificed his life and was crucified, the altar is considered a place of sacrifice. In kissing the altar, the priest symbolizes the bond between Christ and his church; acknowledges the sacrifices of those martyrs (relics) who gave their life for the furtherance of the faith; and, when performed with the deacon, is an extension of peace to the community. The final kiss is also given at the altar to venerate the table as a symbol of Christ, as well as being the place where the faithful offer their bodies as a “living sacrifice.”

The Living Word.

The next holy kiss seals and venerates the Word after the liturgy of the Word at the Ambo. The Ambo is a lectern where the deacon or priest carries the Gospel book. The Gospel is seen to have within it the power to transform the lives of the faithful. According to Catholicism, just as Christ became the living Word, so the faithful should seek to do the same.



Mass Of The Feast Of The Nativity Of The Blessed Virgin Mary 

Mass Of The Feast Of The Nativity Of The Blessed Virgin Mary 


​Saturday 8th September 2018

Weekday (22)

Vestment: White

Today’s Rosary: The Joyful Mystery
The Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Feast)

Today’s feast originated in Jerusalem towards the end of the fifth century. Mary was chosen in a special way to be the handmaid of the Lord and to play an important part in the history of salvation and in the mystery of our redemption. With the whole Church we honour Mary, the mother of Jesus.

Entrance
Antiphon.

Let us celebrate with joy the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, for from her arose the sun of justice, Christ our God.

The Gloria in excels is (Glory to God in the highest) is said.

The Gloria

Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace to people of good will. We bless you, we adore you, we glorify you, we give you thanks for your great glory, Lord God, heavenly King, O God, almighty Father. Lord Jesus Christ, Only Begotten Son, Lord God, Lamb of God, Son of the Father, you take away the sins of the world, have mercy on us; you take away the sins of the world, receive our prayer; you are seated at the right hand of the Father, have mercy on us. For you alone are the Holy One, you alone are the Lord, you alone are the Most High, Jesus Christ, with the Holy Spirit, in the glory of God the Father. Amen.
 

Collect

Impart to your servants, we pray, O Lord, the gift of heavenly grace, that the feast of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin may bring deeper peace to those for whom the birth of her Son was the dawning of salvation. Through our Lord…
 

FIRST READING

The time when she who is in labour pains has brought forth.

A reading from the Book of the Prophet Micah (Micah 5:2-5a).

Thus says the Lord: You, O Bethlehem Ephrathah, who are little to be among the clans of Judah, from you shall come forth for me one who is to be ruler in Israel, whose origin is from of old, from ancient days. Therefore he shall give them up until the time when she who is in labour pains has brought forth; then the rest of his brethren shall return to the sons of Israel. And he shall stand and feed his flock in the strength of the Lord, in the majesty of the name of the Lord his God. And they shall dwell secure, for now he shall be great to the ends of the earth. And this shall be peace.
The word of the Lord.
Or the following:

FIRST
READING

Those whom God foreknew he also predestined.

A reading from the Letter of Saint Paul to the Romans (Romans 8:28-30).

Brethren: We know that in everything God works for good with those who love him, who are called according to his purpose. For those whom he foreknew he also predestined to be conformed to the image of his Son, in order that he might be the first-born among many brethren. And those whom he predestined he also called; and those whom he called he also justified; and those whom he justified he also glorified.
The word of the Lord.
 

RESPONSORIAL
PSALM 

Psalm 13:5.6 (R.Isaiah 61:10a)

R. I will greatly rejoice in the Lord.
As for me, I trust in your merciful love.

Let my heart rejoice in your salvation. R.
I will sing to the Lord

who has been bountiful with me. R.
 

ALLELUIA

Alleluia. Blessed are you, O holy Virgin Mary, and worthy of all praise, because from you arose the sun of justice, Christ our God. Alleluia.
 

GOSPEL

That which is conceived in her is of the Holy Spirit.

A reading from the holy Gospel according to Matthew (Matthew 1:1-16.18-23)

The book of the genealogy of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham. Abraham was the father of Isaac, and Isaac the father of Jacob, and Jacob the father of Judah and his brothers, and Judah the father of Perez and Zerah by Tamar, and Perez the father of Hezron, and Hezron the father of Ram, and Ram the father of Amminadab, and Amminadab the father of Nahshon, and Nahshon the father of Salmon, and Salmon the father of Boaz by Rahab, and Boaz the father of Obed by Ruth, and Obed the father of Jesse, and Jesse the father of David the king. And David was the father of Solomon by the wife of Uriah, and Solomon the father of Rehoboam, and Rehoboam the father of Abijah, and Abijah  the father of Asa, and Asa the father of Jehoshaphat, and Jehoshaphat the father of Joram, and Joram the father of Uzziah, and Uzziah the father  of Jotham, and Jotham the father of Ahaz, and Ahaz the father of Hezekiah, and Hezekiah the father of Manasseh, and Manasseh the father of Amos, and Amos the father of Josiah, and Josiah the father of Jechoniah and his brothers, at the time of the deportation to Babylon. And after the deportation to Babylon: Jechoniah was the father of Shealtiel, and Shealtiel the father of Zerubbabel, and Zerubbabel the father of Abiud, and Abiud the father of Eliakim, and Eliakim the father of Azor, and Azor the father of Zadok, and Zadok the father of Achim, and Achim the father of Eliud, and Eliud the father of Eleazar, and Eleazar the father of Matthan, and Matthan the father of Jacob, and Jacob the father of Joseph the husband of Mary, of whom Jesus was born, who is called Christ.

*Now the birth of Jesus Christ took place in this way. When his mother Mary had been betrothed to Joseph, before they came together she was found to be with child of the Holy Spirit; and  her husband Joseph, being a just man and unwilling to put her to shame, resolved to send her away quietly. But as he considered this, behold, an angel of the Lord appeared to him in a dream, saying, “Joseph, son of David, do not fear to take Mary your wife, for that which is conceived in her is of the Holy Spirit; she will bear a son, and you shall call his name Jesus, for he will save his people from their sins.” All this took place to fulfil what the Lord had spoken by the prophet: “Behold a virgin shall conceive and bear a son, and his name shall be called Emmanuel” (which means, God with us).
The Gospel of the Lord.
Shorter form: Matthew 1:18-23. Read between*
 

Today’s Reflection.

The work of the Holy Spirit in human life emerges as an apparent scandal. Mary is betrothed to joseph but before they come to live together, she is found to be pregnant through the power of the Holy Spirit. Her child will challenge the prevailing understanding of the law, eat with tax collectors and sinners, and make claims that sound blasphemous. However, this is not a scandal but the work of God. Joseph never gets to carry out his quiet divorce; instead he cooperates in the divine plan. He takes Mary into his home because he realizes after the dream that her condition is not a scandal but the work of God. He shelters her and names the child ‘Jesus’. The naming is important for the very presence of the child is a catalyst for clarifying his identity and mission. He is the presence of God that does not depart even when he is no longer physically present. Let us imitate the example of the cooperation of Mary and Joseph in the divine plan of salvation.
 
Today’s Prayer
.

Thank God for today’s feast.

Take the song, “Holy Ghost, do it again, do it again in my life.
Father grant me a glimpse of your glory in the name of Jesus.
Pray for the grace to be attentive to the voice of the spirit.
Pray for revival of the authentic gifts of vision and revelation among believers

A Prayer By St. Padre Pio.

Stay With Me 

Stay with me, Lord, for it is necessary to have you present so that I do not forget you, you know how easily I abandon you. Stay with me, Lord, because I am weak, and I need you strength, that I may not fall so often, stay with me, Lord, for you are my life, and without you, I am without fervor. Stay with me, Lord, for you are my light, and without you, I am in darkness. Stay with me, Lord, to show me your will. Stay with me, Lord, for I desire to love you very much, and always be in your company. Stay with me, Lord, if you wish me to be faithful to you. Stay with me, Lord, for as poor as my soul is, I want it to be a place of consolation for you, a nest of love. Stay with me, Jesus, for it is getting late and the day is coming to a close, and life passes; death, judgment, eternity approaches. It is necessary to renew my strength, so that I will not stop along the way and for that, I need you. It is getting late and death approaches, I fear the darkness, the temptations, the dryness, the cross, the sorrows. O how I need you, my Jesus, in this night of exile! Stay with me tonight, Jesus, in life with all its dangers. I need you. Let me recognize you as your disciples did at the breaking of the bread, so that the Eucharistic Communion be the Light which disperses the darkness, the force which sustains me, the unique joy of my heart. Stay with me, Lord, because at the hour of my death, I want to remain united to you, if not by communion, at least by grace and love. Stay with me, Jesus, I do not ask for divine consolation, because I do not merit it, but the gift of your presence, oh yes, I ask this of you! Stay with me, Lord, for it is you alone I look for, your love, your Grace, your Will, your Heart, your Spirit, because I love you and ask no other reward but to lobe you more and more. With a firm love, I will love you with all my heart while on earth and continue to love you perfectly during all eternity. Amen.



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