Tag: Holy Mass

Why Should I Go To Mass Everyday? 

Why Should I Go To Mass Everyday? 

Why Should I Go to Mass Every Day?” 

+The Mass is the most perfect form of prayer!” (Pope Paul VI).

+For each Mass we hear with devotion, Our Lord sends a saint to comfort us at death (revelation of Christ to St. Gertrude the great). 

+Padre Pio, the stigmatic priest, said, the world could exist more easily without the sun than without the Mass. 

+The Cure’ d’ Ars, St. Jean Vianney said, if we knew the value of the Mass we would die of joy. 

+A great doctor of the Church, St. Anselm, declares that a single Mass offered for oneself during life may be worth more than a thousand celebrated for the same intention after death. 

+St. Leonard of Port Maurice supports this statement by saying that one Mass before death may be more profitable than many after it. 

+”The Holy Mass would be of greater profit if people had it offered in their lifetime, rather than having it celebrated for the relief of their souls after death.”

(Pope Benedict XV). 

+Once, St. Teresa was overwhelmed with God’s Goodness and asked Our Lord, “How can I thank you?” Our Lord replied, “ATTEND ONE MASS.” 

+The Blessed Virgin Mary once told Her faithful servant Alain: “My Son so loves those who assist at the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass that, if it were necessary He would die for them as many times as they’ve heard Masses.” 

(Explication Du Saint Sacrifice De La Messe).

The Faithful Are NOT To Use the Orans Posture During the Our Father

The Faithful Are NOT To Use the Orans Posture During the Our Father

A discussion that is common in Catholic parishes between the more orthodox members of the parish and the more “progressive” members is whether or not the faithful should use the Orans Posture during the Our Father. When such a question comes up, the obvious solution is to go to the rubrics. Unfortunately, in this case, the General Instruction on the Roman Missal (GIRM) is relatively silent on the topic. Because of the GIRM’s silence, many people have taken this to mean that the faithful may do whatever they want. However, this is not the case. In the document, Instruction On Certain Questions Regarding the Collaboration of the Non-Ordained Faithful in the Sacred Ministry of Priests, put out by the Vatican on August 15, 1997, we read,

“In eucharistic celebrations deacons and non-ordained members of the faithful may not pronounce prayers — e.g. especially the eucharistic prayer, with its concluding doxology — or any other parts of the liturgy reserved to the celebrant priest. Neither may deacons or non-ordained members of the faithful use gestures or actions which are proper to the same priest celebrant. It is a grave abuse for any member of the non-ordained faithful to “quasi preside” at the Mass while leaving only that minimal participation to the priest which is necessary to secure validity” (ICP Practical Provisions 6 §2).

What the above statement means is that we may not say the Eucharistic prayers along with the priest — believe it or not, I see people mouthing the words along with the priest every week. More importantly to this topic, this also means the faithful may not use the same gestures that are reserved for the priest celebrant.

As mentioned above, the GIRM is silent with regard to the posture of the faithful during the Our Father, however, the Sacramentary (the book of prayers for Mass used by the priest) states that the celebrant is to pray the Our Father with hands extended. Looking back at ICP, the faithful are NOT to use gestures or actions proper to the priest celebrant. Using this argument, one would think that the rubrics could be used to appeal to the faithful. Unfortunately, many of the faithful view the rubrics as another set of rules and those of us who wish to enforce the rubrics are no better than the Pharisees.

In that regard, let us look instead to another reason why the Orans Posture (and subsequently, holding hands) is not an appropriate gesture for the faithful during the Our Father. The Our Father takes place during the Liturgy of the Eucharist. This time of prayer and offering is directed to God (as is the entire Mass, but more specifically during the Liturgy of the Eucharist). As it is directed toward God, the extending and/or holding of hands creates a horizontal emphasis on the prayer, as opposed to the vertical emphasis that it demands. Many people who prefer hand holding or the Orans Posture argue that the Our Fatheris a community prayer, and as such holding and/or extending hands is a visible sign of that community. However, the Our Father is a community prayer, not because we hold or extend our hands, but because we pray it together as the Body of Christ.

On September 3, 1958 the Sacred Congregation for Rites issued a document titled De musica sacra et sacra liturgia(Instruction on Sacred Music and Sacred Liturgy). This document stated, “Since the Pater Noster is a fitting, and ancient prayer of preparation for Communion, the entire congregation may recite this prayer in unison with the priest in low Masses; the Amen at the end is to be said by all” (DM Prayers and Hymns § 32).

It was at this time that the faithful were given permission to pray the Our Father with the priest. However, the faithful maintained the same posture as before – standing, with their hands folded in prayer. Prior to this Instruction, the priest prayed the Our Father on behalf of the faithful. The Orans Posture is representative of praying on behalf of others. The next time you are at Mass, watch the priest’s gestures closely. Anytime he offers prayers on behalf of the faithful, he uses the Orans Posture. Anytime he is offering other prayers, his hands are folded together. Having a better understanding of what particular gestures mean will lead to a better understanding of the Liturgy.

American journalist Hunter S. Thompson was dead on when he said, “Anything worth doing, is worth doing right.” We are talking about the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass here. The Eucharist, “the source and summit of the Christian Life” (LG 11) is consecrated here. Jesus Christ, the King of Kings and the Lord of Lords makes Himself present during the Mass. It is of the utmost importance that we treat the Mass with the respect it deserves. This is not the time nor the place to get creative and inject one’s own style and preferences.

Source: Catholic365

God Never Fails.

God Never Fails.

*🎷God Never Fails.🎷*

Homily for Wednesday 12th December 2018.

_“Even youths shall faint and be weary, and young men shall fall exhausted; but they who wait for the LORD shall renew their strength, they shall mount up with wings like eagles, they shall run and not be weary, they shall walk and not faint.” *Isaiah 40:30-31.*_

In today’s first reading, God seeks to reveal Himself to the prophet Isaiah. When we are trying to describe something entirely new to someone, we often resort to comparisons so that the person can use the idea of what he knows already to understand what he does not know. So God says to Isaiah, “To whom then will you compare me, that I should be like him?” This is a really tough question because in truth, there is nothing we use to compare God.

Nevertheless, in the course of that passage, God came up with an answer: “The Lord is the everlasting God, the Creator of the ends of the earth. He does not faint or grows weary… He gives the power to faint… Even youths shall faint and be weary, young men shall fall exhausted but they who wait for the Lord shall… run and never be weary, they shall walk and not faint.”

Only God deserves our complete trust. If God is for us, nothing can harm us. God’s power can never reduce, His strength is everlasting. If we place our trust in God and wait on Him, we shall be like eagles, we shall be victorious, we shall have the last laugh.

This fact is exactly what Jesus re-echoes in today’s Gospel passage: “Come to me all you who labour and heavy laden, and I will give you rest… for I am gentle and lowly in heart, and you will find rest for your souls.” 

If we place our trust in God and cast all our fears, worries and troubles (heavy burdens) on Him, we shall mount up wings be like eagles, we shall run and never be tired, walk and never grow faint. We shall be victorious, we shall have the last laugh.

My dear brothers and sisters, what is your burden? Jesus is saying to us today, “Come to Me.” How would you feel if the President of this country tells you, “come and see me?” Happy and hopeful, right? So why are you still troubled? Jesus is the one saying: “Come to Me.” Go and drop the matter right at his feet and let Jesus do what He alone knows how to do best.

_*Sing:*_

What a Friend we have in Jesus.

all our sins and griefs to bear!

What a privilege to carry.

everything to God in prayer!
O what peace we often forfeit,

O what needless pain we bear,

All because we do not carry

everything to God in prayer.

*Let us Pray: Lord Jesus, I trust you and I know you will never fail me. Amen.*

Be Happy. Live Positive. Have Faith. It is well with you. God bless you. 

Wednesday of the 2nd Week of Advent.

*Bible Study: Isaiah 40:25-31, Psalm 103:1-4.8.10 and Matthew 11:28-30*.

-Fr. Evaristus Abu🎺



Why Do Catholic Priests Kiss The Altar At The Beginning Of A Mass?

Why Do Catholic Priests Kiss The Altar At The Beginning Of A Mass?

 

Why Priests Kiss the Altar at the Beginning of a Mass.



The practice of reverencing the altar with a kiss is one of the most ancient liturgical traditions and can be dated back to the 4 th century with certainty. 



The Roman Catholic Mass begins with the procession. Each member genuflects at the altar, and the priest and deacon kiss the altar in an act of veneration.

The Altar of Sacrifice.

In Roman Catholicism, the altar is both the sacrificial table and the place where the paschal feast takes place. During the first centuries of Christianity, when the Eucharist was still illegal, Christian altars were constructed from wood and often resembled ordinary house tables. This practise continued until the Middle Ages when, in 517, the provincial council of Epeaune in France decreed that altars should be made of stone to signify “Christ Jesus himself being the cornerstone” of Catholicism. Venerated relics were conserved in cavities in the stone altars of newly built Basilicas, which were then placed directly above the tomb of a martyr to evoke those times during the persecutions of the church when martyrs’ tombs were utilized as places of Eucharistic celebration.

In Remembrance of Me.

The Eucharist is housed in the Tabernacle, which is present in the sanctuary. It is customary to genuflect in reverence to the Tabernacle when entering the sanctuary. According to Catholicism, Jesus Christ established the Holy Eucharist prior to his death on the cross by informing the twelve apostles to “do this in remembrance of me.” The Eucharist involves the Roman Catholic concept of Transubstantiation: the bread and wine take on the substance of Christ, maintaining their literal taste and appearance while becoming, in essence, his body and blood.

The Altar.

An act of veneration, the holy kiss, or kiss of peace, occurs three times during the Mass, the first of which is at the altar. Like the cross on Calvary, where the Bible says that Jesus Christ sacrificed his life and was crucified, the altar is considered a place of sacrifice. In kissing the altar, the priest symbolizes the bond between Christ and his church; acknowledges the sacrifices of those martyrs (relics) who gave their life for the furtherance of the faith; and, when performed with the deacon, is an extension of peace to the community. The final kiss is also given at the altar to venerate the table as a symbol of Christ, as well as being the place where the faithful offer their bodies as a “living sacrifice.”

The Living Word.

The next holy kiss seals and venerates the Word after the liturgy of the Word at the Ambo. The Ambo is a lectern where the deacon or priest carries the Gospel book. The Gospel is seen to have within it the power to transform the lives of the faithful. According to Catholicism, just as Christ became the living Word, so the faithful should seek to do the same.



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