Tag: holy Eucharist

Do Not Ever Receive the Holy Eucharist in these 3 Wrong Ways…

Do Not Ever Receive the Holy Eucharist in these 3 Wrong Ways…

The Mass and the reception of the Eucharist is the centrepiece of the Christian life. So we better take it seriously!

Unfortunately, whether it’s out of ignorance or laziness, it seems most Catholics aren’t receiving the Eucharist correctly.

Here are 3 things it seems many Catholics get wrong:

1) Not bowing before receiving

Many Catholics go through the communion line and receive the Eucharist without any act of reverence at all. But we’re talking about receiving Jesus here, so maybe some reverence is in order!

Most people might not even know that they are supposed to do something, but it’s right there in the USCCB’s General Instruction of the Roman Missal: “When receiving Holy Communion, the communicant bows his or her head before the Sacrament as a gesture of reverence… [T]he sign of reverence is also made before receiving the Precious Blood.” (GIRM 160)

Though the norm in the United States is to receive while standing (after bowing your head), individuals are also allowed to receive while kneeling if they so choose. (GIRM 160)

But don’t do nothing!

2) Not saying “Amen”

This might get dropped as people feel pressure to receive quickly due to long lines, but it’s right there in the Order of Mass: after the priest presents the Eucharist saying “The Body of Christ,” the person receiving is supposed to say “Amen.”

This is important because it confirms that you really do believe that you are receiving Christ himself (it might even serve as a good reminder to yourself).

This is only one word, so slow down and say “Amen.”

3) Are you in a state of grace?

Of course, it’s impossible to know the state of people’s souls. But it’s not clear most Catholics really understand this: you are only supposed to receive the Eucharist if you are a practising Catholic in a state of grace.

Have you committed any mortal sins since you last went to confession? If the answer is yes, then you need to go to confession before receiving the Eucharist. You should still attend Mass, but if you aren’t in a state of grace, you shouldn’t receive.

This is important for at least two reasons: (1) Receiving the Eucharist in a state of mortal sin is a sacrilege. So don’t do it! (2) Not receiving when you are not in the proper state shows your love and respect for Jesus. If you’re in a state of mortal sin, going to Mass but not receiving actually shows you’re heading back on the right track.

Mass Is For The Eucharist Not Pictures – Pope Francis

Mass Is For The Eucharist Not Pictures – Pope Francis

Mass is for the Eucharist not Pictures…Pope Francis

Wednesday a fiery Pope Francis chastised those who spend Mass talking to others, looking at their phone or even taking pictures during papal liturgies, saying these are distractions that take focus away from the “heart of the Church,” which is the Eucharist.

“The Mass is not a show: it is to go to meet the passion and resurrection of the Lord,” the Pope said Nov. 8. “The Lord is here with us, present. Many times we go there, we look at things and chat among ourselves while the priest celebrates the Eucharist… But it is the Lord!”

In particular, Francis condemned the use of cell phones to take photos at papal Masses. At one point during the Mass the priest says, “we lift up our hearts,” he said. “He does not say, ‘We lift up our phones to take photographs!’”

“It’s a bad thing! And I tell you that it gives me so much sadness when I celebrate here in the Piazza or Basilica and I see so many raised cellphones, not just of the faithful, even of some priests and even bishops.”

“But think: when you go to Mass, the Lord is there! And you’re distracted. (But) it is the Lord!”

During the general audience, Pope Francis said the Eucharist would be the new focus of his weekly catechesis for the year, because “it is fundamental for us Christians to understand well the value and meaning of the Holy Mass to live more and more fully our relationship with God.”

In the Eucharist we rediscover, through our senses, what is essential, he said. Just as the Apostle Thomas asked to see and touch the wounds of Jesus after his resurrection, we need the same thing: “to see him and touch him to be able to recognize him.”

In this way, the Sacraments meet this very “human need” of ours, he said. And in the Eucharist, in particular, we find a privileged way to meet God and his love.

The Second Vatican Council was inspired by the desire to help Christians understand the beauty of the encounter in the Eucharist even better, he continued. This is why “it was necessary first to implement, with the guidance of the Holy Spirit, an adequate renewal of the liturgy.”

A central theme emphasized at Vatican II was the liturgical formation of the faithful, which Francis said is also the aim of the series of catechesis he began today: to help people “grow in the knowledge of this great gift God has given us in the Eucharist.”

As a side note, Francis asked if people had noticed the chaotic way children make the sign of cross at Mass, moving their hand all over their chest, and asked people to teach children to make the sign of the cross well.

“We need to teach children to do the sign of the cross well,” he said, noting that this is how Mass begins, because just as Mass begins this way, “so life begins, so the day begins.”

Concluding his reflection on the Mass and the Eucharist, Pope Francis said that he hopes that through these brief weekly lessons everyone will rediscover the beauty “hidden in the Eucharistic celebration, and which, when revealed, gives a full meaning to the life of everyone.”

This is Why Judas Iscariot Rejected the Holy Eucharist

This is Why Judas Iscariot Rejected the Holy Eucharist

“Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood remains in me, and I in them.” (John 6:56)

Judas’ betrayal of Jesus seems to be directly related to his rejection of the Eucharistic doctrine preached by Jesus as set forth in the sixth chapter of John’s Gospel. Repeatedly in that “Bread of Life Discourse” preached at the synagogue in Capernaum, Jesus made the amazing claim that his body and blood were true food and drink, saying “my flesh is real food and my blood is real drink” and that “if you do not eat the flesh of the Son of man and drink his blood, you have no life in you” (see verses 6:26 through 6:71).

After preaching this challenging lesson on the Eucharist, the Gospel text specifically states that many of Jesus’ followers became disillusioned and left him. The text says:

Many of his disciples, when they heard it, said, “This is a hard saying; who can listen to it?” (John 6: 60)

After this many of his disciples drew back and no longer went about with him (John 6:66)

It is somewhat chilling (although most likely only coincidental) that the very verse where many of Jesus’ followers left Him, secondary to Jesus’ sermon on the Eucharist, is John 6:66.

It is not coincidental, however, that at that moment when so many of Jesus’ followers were leaving him because of his teaching on the Eucharist, Jesus mentions Judas’ own unbelief, stating:

“But there are some of you that do not believe.” For Jesus knew from the first who those were that did not believe, and who it was that would betray him (John 6:64)

Jesus said to the twelve, “Do you also wish to go away?” Simon Peter answered him, “Lord, to whom shall we go? You have the words of eternal life; and we have believed, and have come to know, that you are the Holy One of God.” Jesus answered them, “Did I not choose you, the twelve, and one of you is a devil?” He spoke of Judas the son of Simon Iscariot, for he, one of the twelve, was to betray him (John 6: 68-71)

John 6 foreshadows Judas’ ultimate betrayal of Jesus which began on Holy Thursday, the very day Jesus instituted the Eucharist as the “new covenant in my blood” (Luke 22:20). We Catholics have the unbelievable privilege of truly receiving the body and blood of Jesus at Holy Mass.

And even though we may hear an echo of John 6:60 (“This is a hard saying; who can listen to it”) from voices not in harmony with the Church on this critical teaching concerning the real presence (Body, Blood, Soul, and Divinity) of Jesus in the Eucharist, we must cling to this teaching of Jesus like Peter did when the Lord asked him if he also wanted to leave the Lord over this doctrine, saying, like Peter, “Lord, to whom shall we go? You have the message of eternal life” (John 6:68).

After leaving the Last Supper and going out into the “dark” (John 13:30), Judas subsequently that same evening gave Jesus a kiss of betrayal in the Garden of Gethsemane. It was after leaving Jesus’ first Mass early (on Holy Thursday) that Judas went out and led the authorities to arrest our Lord.

The Holy Eucharist can be Dangerous to Your Soul If….

The Holy Eucharist can be Dangerous to Your Soul If….

How is the Holy Eucharist dangerous for the soul of the unprepared?

Question:

Is it really a sin to receive the Eucharist in mortal sin?

Answer:

No, it isn’t simply a mortal sin but a form of sacrilege; it is worse than a mortal sin to receive Jesus in mortal sin. The once life-giving body and blood of Christ become judgment to the soul. It is important to realize that we mustn’t rise with everyone every time they’re going to receive the Eucharist.

We have to carefully examine ourselves. Thankfully, a sound conscience doesn’t need much examination to realize whether or not they’re in the state of grace. Here’s what the Church says about receiving without preparation:

To respond to this invitation we must prepare ourselves for so great and so holy a moment. St. Paul urges us to examine our conscience: “Whoever, therefore, eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner will be guilty of profaning the body and blood of the Lord.

Let a man examine himself, and so eat of the bread and drink of the cup. For anyone who eats and drinks without discerning the body eats and drinks judgment upon himself.” Anyone conscious of a grave sin must receive the sacrament of reconciliation before coming to Communion

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