Tag:  Exorcism

The Demon Beelzebub Speaks On The Holy Curé Of Ars During An Exorcism 

The Demon Beelzebub Speaks On The Holy Curé Of Ars During An Exorcism 

Beelzebub Speaks On THE HOLY CURÉ OF ARS During An Exorcism.

The word Curé is a French word meaning pastor. Ars is a village in the country of France.The Curé of Ars we are named for is St. John Marie Vianney who was born on May 8, 1786 in Dardilly, France.

Many people think of Curé as being a cure instead of the correct meaning of the word which is Pastor. He was the priest or the Pastor in charge of the church in the village of Ars in France.

The following is a revelation made by the Demon Beelzebub during an exorcism done by the Curé of Ars – St. John Marie Vianney:

Beelzebub: It is necessary to make sacrifices, as a parish priest, Vianney of Ars, used to make them. He used to pray for entire nights when he knew that there were some sheep in his fold who were not living at all according to the Will of God. He used to give everything and sacrifice everything. He did not even sleep in a proper bed. Often, he used to pray for hours in front of the tabernacle… sometimes in order to save only one, single soul.

He came under furious attacks from the rest of us down there (he points downward), often because of just one soul… and that when he was not at all clever, and was very weak in theology and Latin. The priests of today say to themselves: “We are clever, we are doctors, we know everything better.” But in the final analysis, those are not the things which They are concerned about up there (he points upward). They are not concerned whether someone is clever, or about what he has in his brain, or about what he knows about philosophy and mathematics. Before all else, they consider this: is he a true shepherd? Does he go to look for his sheep, is he ready to give his life and everything that he has for his sheep? That is what Those up there are looking at (he points upward); and the great evil today is that the priests of this time do not do those things any more.

There should be preaching again about the Curé of Ars, and about Catherine Emmerich, who, on her bed of pain, did nothing but suffer and pray for the Church. Many other Saints have done that too. Padre Pio has suffered much for the Church and for sinners. It should be proclaimed from the height of the pulpits that it would be better to devote one’s time to imitating Christ, rather than to gaining doctorates.

There must be some of those, it is true. But for the majority, it would be better if they did not study philosophy or mathematics or theology, etc. For many, it would be better to spend half their nights in prayer and invoking the Holy Spirit; to live the true imitation of Christ and the Marian doctrine of Saint Grignion de Montfort, for example: putting their trust completely in the Blessed Virgin, in her Most Pure Heart and in the Sacred Heart of Jesus; to look towards the Cross and do exactly what Those up there wish (he points upward). That would be better than toiling and studying for hours, simply to make an impression before the world… How I have been forced to say that (he shouts!) How I have been forced to say that!

E: In the name… tell the truth!

Beelzebub: Lenin, for example, the Father of the Russian Revolution, has said that it was necessary to give up whole nights and all his time for the Revolution… But many priests do not even do what the unbelievers do. Lenin knew what had to be done to make the Revolution succeed. He gave up everything for that… But, She, the Great Lady, makes me say, the priests of today are no longer prepared to sacrifice themselves entirely, and to sacrifice everything that they have for the people.

It is true that they must reckon with this: the more someone sacrifices himself, the more we fight against him. That was the way it was for the priest Vianney. We started a fire in his room. But that is of no consequence, Those up there make me say (he points upward). In spite of everything, Those up there and the Great Lady will be victorious… and the priests who still practice the true priesthood will carry off an incomparable victory.

No doctorate, nor any other title, can be compared with the good done by priests who still have the true understanding of souls, and the true understanding of men, and who know how to put themselves in the place of each man. They ask themselves: “What else could I do to save these people? What is the best way to preach? What must I do to bring them back to the practice of the Sacraments?” Naturally, it is necessary at the same time for them to administer the Sacraments in the proper way and according to the ancient rite, so that the heavenly blessing may be attached to them. UNLESS THEY DO THIS, THEY HAVE TO SOME DEGREE LOST GROUND.

Heaven must be earned painfully. Christ exercised the true Priesthood in the most perfect, the most pure and the most incomparable way; and His Apostles did too. They did not wonder whether they would be imprisoned or martyred. They had no fear. Our priests, on the other hand, are afraid of losing their position if they do not do exactly what many bishops say, although this is not the truth, and this is not obedience any more according to the way Those up there see it (he points upward). For we have already had to say that, now, one can no longer obey in cases where the command is not what it should be… Ah! This is crazy, that we have been obliged to speak in this way!

E: Can it be said that it is better to obey God than to obey men? In the name…!

Beelzebub: God MUST be obeyed in preference to men! Did the Apostles have regard for men, Romans or anyone else? They had courage. They went to prison and gave themselves up to martyrdom for Christ…

Where, therefore, among today’s Christians, is the Sacrament of Confirmation, the mark of the Soldier of Christ, which they have on their brow? Catholics still bear this mark – and the priests have, in addition, that of their priestly consecration – and they would have the Angels to assist them. Why, for the love of Heaven, don’t priests pray to the Holy Angels? Why don’t they call on their patron Saints? And Saints Peter and Paul? And all the Apostles and Doctors of the Church? What things they could teach them, or how they could inspire them, if only they were invoked! And, before all else, the Holy Spirit.

The Apostles had no fear of anything and nothing was too high a price for them. They used to administer the Sacraments properly, and they had a great respect for them. That is where you should be looking – towards the first Apostles… not towards those who came later, towards isolated groups who did not live and did not act at all after the example of the Apostles. You must not look towards the mediocre, the negative, but upwards, towards the best and what was done by the best. If you do this, you cannot say: these ones here and those ones there did things well… and no more can you imagine that now the same thing is good. This is a monumental error.

Ah! How we hated this priest of Ars! We were in a terrible rage against him! He was so stupid, he did not even know Latin properly. How was he able to snatch such a great crowd of people away from us – people who, without him, would have come to Hell?

Ah! She makes me say: “If only there were more priests like this Curé (parish priest) Vianney!” It is not money, nor possessions, nor intelligence that count. What does count, is what the priests do, what the state of their soul is, and the way in which they carry out the Will of God. That is what counts, even if they should be the least among men in the eyes of the world, and seem to be of no consequence and to occupy only the lowliest of positions. Those priests are much greater in the eyes of Those up there (he points upwards)… than he who wears a bishop’s miter, or a cardinal’s hat, or anything else you like! Ah! How we have been forced to say that!

Taken From the Book “Warnings From The Beyondby Jean Marty.

The Surprising Day the Devil Himself Praised Mary’s Immaculate Conception.

The Surprising Day the Devil Himself Praised Mary’s Immaculate Conception.

During an exorcism in Italy in 1823, two Dominican priests made the Devil acknowledge the dogma that would be declared 30 years later!

December 8, 1854: Pope Pius IX promulgates the dogma of the Immaculate Conception of Mary.

March 25, 1858: On the feast of the Incarnation of the Word, the Blessed Virgin appears in Lourdes to St. Bernadette and confirms the dogma, saying, “I am the Immaculate Conception.”

But 20 years earlier, another supernatural and surprising event had already confirmed the Immaculate Conception of the Virgin Mother of God. And the one who declared it was someone we would never have expected to do so. The event is related to Fr. Gabriele Amorth, a late exorcist of the Diocese of Rome.

It was the year 1823. The devil had possessed an illiterate 12-year-old boy, who lived in what is today the Italian province of Avellino, near Naples in southern Italy. Two Dominican priests who were in the city, Fr. Gassiti and Fr. Pignataro, were both authorized by the bishop to perform exorcisms.

The priests asked the demon that was possessing the boy a series of questions—among them, one about the Immaculate Conception.

The devil admitted that the Virgin of Nazareth had never been under his power: not even at the first instant of her life because she was conceived “full of grace” and fully belonging to God.

Although he may be the “father of lies,” the devil can be forced to tell the truth during an exorcism, even in matters of faith. This was how the two exorcists forced him to pay homage to the Virgin and praise her Immaculate Conception, in verse.

Humiliated, the devil was coerced, in the name of Christ, to sing the glory of Mary, and he did so by means of a sonnet in Italian—perfect in form and in theology!

Here, we present the original in Italian, and then the translation into English:

In Italian:

Vera Madre son Io d’un Dio che è Figlio
e son figlia di Lui, benché sua Madre;
ab aeterno nacqu’Egli ed è mio Figlio,
in tempo Io nacqui e pur gli sono Madre.

Egli è mio creator ed è mio Figlio,
son Io sua creatura e gli son Madre;
fu prodigo divin l’esser mio Figlio
un Dio eterno, e Me d’aver per Madre.

L’esser quasi è comun tra Madre e Figlio
perché l’esser dal Figlio ebbe la Madre,
e l’esser dalla Madre ebbe anche il Figlio.

Or, se l’esser dal Figlio ebbe la Madre,
o s’ha da dir che fu macchiato il Figlio,
o senza macchia s’ha da dir la Madre.

In English:

I am the true Mother of a God who is Son,
And I am his daughter, although his Mother;

He was born from eternity, and is my Son,

I was born within time, and yet I am his Mother.

He is my creator, and is my Son,
I am his creation, and his mother;

It was a divine marvel that my Son

Was an eternal God, who had Me as his Mother.

Our being is almost shared between Mother and Son

Because the Mother received her existence from her Son,

And the Son also received his existence from his Mother.

If, then, the Son received his existence from his Mother,

We either must say that the Son was stained by the Mother,

Or we must say that the Mother is Immaculate.

O Mary Conceived Without Original Sin, Pray For Us Who Have Recourse To Thee!

A Man Of Science Encounters Demonic Possession 

A Man Of Science Encounters Demonic Possession 

One June evening, a small group of nuns and priests met the woman in the chapel of a house Though it was warm outside, a palpable chill settled over the room.

As the priests began to pray, the woman slipped into a trance — and then snapped to life. She spoke in multiple voices: One was deep, guttural and masculine; another was high-pitched; a third spouted only Latin. When someone secretly sprinkled ordinary water on her, she didn’t react. But when holy water was used, she screamed in pain.

“Leave her alone, you f***ing priests,” the guttural voice shouted. “Stop, you whores. … You’ll be sorry.”

You’ve probably seen this before: a soul corrupted by Satan, a priest waving a crucifix at a snarling woman. Movies and books have mimicked exorcisms so often, they’ve become clichés.

The 1973 film "The Exorcist" shaped how many see demonic possession.

The 1973 film “The Exorcist” shaped how many see demonic possession.

But this was an actual exorcism — and included a character not normally seen in the traditional drive-out-the-devil script.

Dr. Richard Gallagher is an Ivy League-educated, board-certified psychiatrist who teaches at Columbia University and New York Medical College. He was part of the team that tried to help the woman.

Fighting Satan’s minions wasn’t part of Gallagher’s career plan while he was studying medicine at Yale. He knew about biblical accounts of demonic possession but thought they were an ancient culture’s attempt to grapple with mental disorders like epilepsy. He proudly calls himself a “man of science.”

Yet today, Gallagher has become something else: the go-to guy for a sprawling network of exorcists in the United States. He says demonic possession is real. He’s seen the evidence: victims suddenly speaking perfect Latin; sacred objects flying off shelves; people displaying “hidden knowledge” or secrets about people that they could not have possibly have known.

“There was one woman who was like 90 pounds soaking wet. She threw a Lutheran deacon who was about 200 pounds across the room,” he says. “That’s not psychiatry. That’s beyond psychiatry.”

Gallagher calls himself a “consultant” on demonic possessions. For the past 25 years, he has helped clergy distinguish between mental illness and what he calls “the real thing.” He estimates that he’s seen more cases of possession than any other physician in the world.

“Whenever I need help, I call on him,” says the Rev. Fr. Gary Thomas, one of the most famous exorcists in the United States. The movie “The Rite” was based on Thomas’ work.

“He’s so respected in the field,” Thomas says. “He’s not like most therapists, who are either atheists or agnostics.”

Gallagher is a big man — 6-foot-5 — who once played semipro basketball in Europe. He has a gruff, no-nonsense demeanor. When he talks about possession, it sounds as if he’s describing the growth of algae; his tone is dry, clinical, matter-of-fact.

Possession, he says, is rare — but real.

“I spend more time convincing people that they’re not possessed than they are,” he wrote in an essay for The Washington Post.

Some critics, though, say Gallagher has become possessed by his own delusions. They say all he’s witnessed are cheap parlor tricks by people who might need therapy but certainly not exorcism. And, they argue, there’s no empirical evidence that proves possession is real.

Still, one of the biggest mysteries about Gallagher’s work isn’t what he’s seen. It’s how he’s evolved.

How does a “man of science” get pulled into the world of demonic possession?

His short answer: He met a queen of Satan.

A ‘creepy’ encounter with evil

She was a middle-aged woman who wore flowing dark clothes and black eye shadow. She could be charming and engaging. She was also part of a satanic cult.

She called herself the queen of the cult, but Gallagher would refer to her as “Julia,” the pseudonym he gave her.

The woman had approached her local priest, convinced she was being attacked by a demon. The priest referred her to an exorcist, who reached out to Gallagher for a mental health evaluation.

Why, though, would a devil worshipper want to be free of the devil?

She was conflicted,” Gallagher says. “There was a part of her that wanted to be relieved of the possession.”

She ended up relieving Gallagher of his doubts. It was one of the first cases he took, and it changed him. Gallagher helped assemble an exorcism team that met Julia in the chapel of a house.

Objects would fly off shelves around her. She somehow knew personal details about Gallagher’s life: how his mother had died of ovarian cancer; the fact that two cats in his house went berserk fighting each other the night before one of her sessions.

Julia found a way to reach him even when she wasn’t with him, he says.

He was talking on the phone with Julia’s priest one night, he says, when both men heard one of the demonic voices that came from Julia during her trances — even though she was nowhere near a phone and thousands of miles away.

He says he was never afraid.

“It’s creepy,” he says. “But I believe I’m on the winning side.”

How a scientist believes in demons

He also insists that he’s on the side of science.

He says he’s a stickler for the scientific method, that it teaches people to follow the facts wherever they may lead.

Growing up in a large Irish Catholic family in Long Island, he didn’t think much about stories of possession. But when he kept seeing cases like Julia’s as a professional, he says, his views had to evolve.

Some priests say those who dabble in the occult are opening doorways to the demonic.

Some priests say those who dabble in the occult are opening doorways to the demonic.

“I don’t believe in this stuff because I’m Catholic,” he says. “I try to follow the evidence.”

Being Catholic, though, may help.

Gallagher grew up in a home where faith was taken seriously. His younger brother, Mark, says Gallagher was an academic prodigy with a photographic memory who wanted to use his faith to help people.

“We had a sensational childhood,” Mark Gallagher says. “My mother and father were great about always helping neighbors or relatives out.” Their mother was a homemaker, and their father was a lawyer who’d fought in World War II. “My father used to walk us proudly into church. He taught us to give back.”

Gallagher’s two ways of giving back — helping the mentally ill as well as the possessed — may seem at odds. But not necessarily for those in the Catholic Church.

Contemporary Catholicism doesn’t see faith and science as contradictory. Its leaders insist that possession, miracles and angels exist. But global warming is real, so is evolution, and miracles must be documented with scientific rigor.

One of Gallagher’s favorite sources of inspiration is Pope John Paul II’s encyclical “Fides et Ratio” (“On Faith and Reason”). The Pope writes that “there can never be a true divergence between faith and reason, since the same God who reveals the mysteries and bestows the gift of faith has also placed in the human spirit the light of reason.”

The church’s emphasis on faith and reason can even be seen in the birth of its exorcism ritual.

The Rite of Exorcism was first published in 1614 by Pope Paul V to quell a trend of laypeople and priests hastily performing exorcisms on people they presumed were possessed, such as victims of the bubonic plague, says the Rev. Fr. Mike Driscoll, author of “Demons, Deliverance, Discernment: Separating Fact from Fiction about the Spirit World.”

“A line (in the rite) said that the exorcist should be careful to distinguish between demon possession and melancholy, which was a catchall for mental illness,” Driscoll says. “The church knew back then that there were mental problems. It said the exorcist should not have anything to do with medicine. Leave that to the doctors.”

Doctors, perhaps, like Gallagher.

Gallagher says the concept of possession by spirit isn’t limited to Catholicism. Muslim, Jewish and other Christian traditions regard possession by spirits — holy or benign — as possible.

This is not quite as esoteric as some people make it out to be,” Gallagher says. I know quite a few psychiatrists and mental health professionals who believe in this stuff.”

Dr. Mark Albanese is among them. A friend of Gallagher’s, Albanese studied medicine at Cornell and has been practicing psychiatry for decades. In a letter to the New Oxford Review, a Catholic magazine, he defended Gallagher’s belief in possession.

He also says there is a growing belief among health professionals that a patient’s spiritual dimension should be accounted for in treatment, whether their provider agrees with those beliefs or not. Some psychiatrists have even talked of adding a “trance and possession disorder” diagnosis to the DSM, the premier diagnostic manual of disorders used by mental health professionals in the US.

There’s still so much about the human mind that psychiatrists don’t know, Albanese says. Doctors used to be widely skeptical of people who claimed to suffer from multiple personalities, but now it’s a legitimate disorder (dissociative identity disorder). Many are still dumbfounded by the power of placebos, a harmless pill or medical procedure that produces healing in some cases.

There’s a certain openness to experiences that are happening that are beyond what we can explain by MRI scans, neurobiology or even psychological theories,” Albanese says.

Dr. Jeffrey Lieberman, a psychiatrist who specializes in schizophrenia, arrived at a similar conclusion after he had an unnerving experience with a patient.

Lieberman was asked to examine the videotape of an exorcism that he subsequently dismissed as unconvincing.

Then he met a woman who, he said, “freaked me out.”

Lieberman, director of the New York State Psychiatric Institute, says he and a family therapist were asked to examine a young woman who some thought was possessed. He and his colleague tried to treat the woman for several months but gave up because they had no success.

The film "The Rite" is based on the life of the Rev. Gary Thomas, one of the leading exorcists in the US.

The film “The Rite” is based on the life of the Rev. Gary Thomas, one of the leading exorcists in the US.

Something happened during the treatment, though, that he still can’t explain. After sessions with the woman, he says, he’d go home in the evenings, and the lights in his house would go off by themselves, photographs and artwork would fall or slide off shelves, and he’d experience a piercing headache.

When he mentioned this to his colleague one day, her response stunned him: She’d been having the exact same experiences.

“I had to sort of admit that I didn’t really know what was going on,” Lieberman says. “Because of the bizarre things that occurred, I wouldn’t say that (demonic possession) is impossible or categorically rule it out … although I have very limited empirical evidence to verify its existence.”

The tragic case of the real ‘Emily Rose’

If you want to know why so many scientists and doctors like Lieberman are cautious about legitimizing demonic possession, consider one name: Anneliese Michel.

Michel was a victim in one of the most notorious cases of contemporary exorcism. If you have the stomach for it, go online and listen to audiotapes and watch videos of her exorcisms. The images and sounds will burn themselves into your brain. It sounds like somebody dropped a microphone into hell.

Michel was a German Catholic woman who died of starvation in 1976 after 67 exorcisms over a period of nine months. She was diagnosed with epilepsy but believed she was possessed. So did her devout Roman Catholic parents. She reportedly displayed some of the classic signs of possession: abnormal strength, aversion to sacred objects, speaking different languages.

But authorities later determined that it was Michel’s parents and two priests who were responsible for her death. German authorities put them on trial for murder, and they were found guilty of negligent homicide. The 2005 film “The Exorcism of Emily Rose” was based on Michel’s ordeal and the subsequent trial.

One of the leading skeptics of exorcism — and one of Gallagher’s chief critics — is Steven Novella, a neurologist and professor at Yale School of Medicine.

He wrote a lengthy blog post dissecting Gallagher’s experience with Julia, the satanic priestess. It could be read as a takedown of exorcisms everywhere.

He says Julia probably performed a “cold reading” on Gallagher. It’s an old trick of fortune tellers and mediums in which they use vague, probing statements to make canny guesses about someone. (Fortune teller: “I see a recent tragedy in your family.” Client: “You mean my sister who got hurt in a car accident? How did you know?”)

Or take the case of a person speaking an unfamiliar language like Latin during a possession.

A patient might memorize Latin phrases to throw out during one of their possessions,” Novella wrote. “Were they having a conversation in Latin? Did they understand Latin spoken to them? Or did they just speak Latin?”

Novella says it’s noteworthy that no one has filmed any paranormal event such as levitation or sacred objects flying across the room during an exorcism. He’s seen exorcism tapes posted online and in documentaries and says they’re not scary.

“They’re boring,” he says. “Nothing exciting happens. The most you get is some really bad play-acting by the person who is being exorcised.”

In an interview, Novella went further and criticized any therapist who believes his patient’s delusions.

“The worst thing you can do to a patient who is delusional is to confirm their delusions,” says Novella, who founded the New England Skeptical Society.

“The primary goal of therapy is to reorient them to reality. Telling a patient who is struggling that maybe they’re possessed by a demon is the worst thing you can do. It’s only distracting them from addressing what the real problem is.”

The 2005 horror film "The Exorcism of Emily Rose" was loosely based on the death of Anneliese Michel.

The 2005 horror film “The Exorcism of Emily Rose” was loosely based on the death of Anneliese Michel.

Driscoll, the Catholic priest who wrote a book about possession, is not a skeptic like Novella. Still, he says, it’s not unusual for people on drugs or during psychotic episodes to display abnormal strength.

“I have seen it take four grown guys to hold one small woman down,” says Driscoll, a chaplain at St. Elizabeth Medical Center in Ottawa, Illinois. “When a person has no fear and is not in their right mind and they don’t care about hurting themselves or hurting others, you can see heartbreaking things.”

That doesn’t mean he thinks possession isn’t real. He says the New Testament is full of accounts of Jesus confronting demons.

“Do I still believe it happens? Yes, I do,” he says. “It happened then. I don’t know why it would be totally eradicated now.”

Gallagher agrees and has answers for skeptics like Novella.

He says demons won’t submit to lab studies or allow themselves to be easily recorded by video equipment. They want to sow doubt, not confirm their existence, he says. Nor will the church compromise the privacy of a person suffering from possession just to provide film to skeptics.

Gallagher says he sees his work with the possessed as an extension of his responsibilities as a doctor.

In a passage from a book he is working on about demonic possession in America, he says that it is the duty of a physician to help people in great distress “without concern whether they have debatable or controversial conditions.”

Gallagher isn’t the first psychiatrist to feel such duty. Dr. M. Scott Peck, the late author of “The Road Less Traveled,” conducted two exorcisms himself — something Gallagher considers unwise and dangerous for any psychiatrist.

“I didn’t go volunteering for this,” he says. “I went into this because different people over the last few decades realized that I was open to this sort of thing. The referrals are almost invariably from priests. It’s not like someone is walking into my office and I say, ‘You must be possessed.’ “

What happened to Satan’s queen

He may not have asked to join the “hidden” world of exorcism, but he is an integral part of that community today. He’s been featured in stories and documentaries about exorcism and is on the governing board of the Rome-based International Association of Exorcists.

“It’s deepened my faith,” he says of the exorcisms he’s witnessed. “It didn’t radically change it, but it validated my faith.”

He says he’s received thanks from many people he’s helped over the years. Some wept, grateful to him for not dismissing them as delusional. As for letting a journalist talk to any of these people, Gallagher says he zealously guards their privacy.

Belief in possession exists in many religious traditions. Here, a man enters a state of possession during an African voodoo ceremony.

Belief in possession exists in many religious traditions. Here, a man enters a state of possession during an African voodoo ceremony.

Julia, though, gave him permission to tell her story. But it didn’t have a happy ending.

He and a team of exorcists continued to see her, but eventually, she called a halt to the sessions. She was too ambivalent. She relished some of the abilities she displayed during her trances. She was “playing both sides.”

“Exorcism is not some kind of magical incantation,” Gallagher says. “Normally, a person has to make their own sincere spiritual efforts, too.”

About a year after she dropped out, Gallagher says, he heard Julia’s voice on the phone again. This time, she had called to tell him she was dying of cancer.

Gallagher says he offered to try to help her with a team of priests while she was still physically able, but her response was terse:

“Well, I’ll give it some thought.”

He says he never heard from her again.

Inevitably, there will be others. His phone will ring. A priest will tell him a story. A team of clergy and nuns will be summoned. And the man of science will enter the hidden world of exorcism again.

The critics, the souls that aren’t saved, the creepy encounters — they don’t seem to deter him.

Truly informed exorcists don’t tend to get discouraged,” he says, “because they know it is our Lord who delivers the person, not themselves.”

Is Gallagher doing God’s work, or does he need deliverance from his own delusions?

Perhaps only God — and Satan — knows for sure.

Source:

CNN 

‘Exorcismo Magno’: Can An Entire Country Be Infested With Demons? Here Are Reasons To Believe So

‘Exorcismo Magno’: Can An Entire Country Be Infested With Demons? Here Are Reasons To Believe So

Pope Francis


Can a country with deep Christian roots like Mexico find itself at the mercy of demons? Some in the Church fear so.

And as a result, they called for a nation-wide exorcism of Mexico, carried out quietly in May 2015 in the cathedral of San Luis Potosí.

High levels of violence, as well as drug cartels and abortion in the country, were the motivation behind the special rite of exorcism, known as “Exorcismo Magno.”

Cardinal Juan Sandoval Íñiguez, the archbishop emeritus of Guadalajara, presided at the closed doors ceremony, the first ever in the history of Mexico.

Also participating were Archbishop Jesús Carlos Cabrero of San Luis Potosí, Spanish demonologist and exorcist Father José Antonio Fortea, and a smaller group of priests and lay people.

The event was not made known to the general public beforehand. According to Archbishop Cabrero, the reserved character of the May 20 ceremony was intended to avoid any misguided interpretations of the ritual.

But how can an entire country become infested by demons to the point that it’s necessary to resort to an Exorcismo Magno?

“To the extent sin increases more and more in a country, to that extent it becomes easier for the demons to tempt (people),” Fr. Fortea told CNA.

The Spanish exorcist warned that “to the extent there is more witchcraft and Satanism going on in a country, to that extent there will be more extraordinary manifestations of those powers of darkness.”

Fr. Fortea said that “the exorcism performed in San Luís Potosí is the first ever carried out in Mexico in which the exorcists came from different parts of the country and gathered together to exorcise the powers of darkness, not from a person, but from the whole country.”

“This rite of exorcism, beautiful and liturgical, had never before taken place in any part of the world. Although it had taken place in a private manner as when Saint Francis (exorcised) the Italian city of Arezzo,” he stated.

The Spanish exorcist explained, however, that the celebration of this ritual will not automatically change the difficult situation Mexico is going through in a single day.

“It would be a big mistake to think that by performing a full scale exorcism of the country everything would automatically change right away.”

Nevertheless, he emphasized that “if with the power we’ve received from Christ we expel the demons from a country, this will certainly have positive repercussions, because we’ll make a great number of the tempters flee, even if this exorcism is partial.”

“We don’t drive out all the evil spirits from a country with just one ceremony. But even though all will not be expelled, those that were removed are not there anymore.”

Fr. Fortea emphasized that “when the exorcists of a country drive out its demons, it has to be done in faith. You’re not going to see anything, feel anything, there’s not going to be any extraordinary phenomenon. We have to have faith that God conferred on the apostles a power, and that we can use this power.”

“In any case, if this ritual were to be carried out in more countries once in a year, before or after, this would put an end to any extraordinary manifestations which would show us the rage of the devil. Because, without a doubt, the demons hate to be driven out of a place or to be bound with the power of Christ.”

The Spanish exorcist said that “it would be very desirable that when there’s an annual meeting of exorcists in a country, a ritual such as this exorcismo magno that took place in Mexico be performed.”

He also emphasized that a bishop “can authorize its occurrence once a year with his priests in the cathedral.”

“The bishop is the shepherd and he can use the power he has received to drive away the invisible wolves from the sheep, since Satan is like a roaring lion prowling around looking for someone to devour, and the shepherds can drive away the predator from the victim,” he concluded.

Source:

CNA/EWTN News

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