Tag: Eucharist

To Kneel Or To Sit After Communion, Which Is The Right Thing To Do?

To Kneel Or To Sit After Communion, Which Is The Right Thing To Do?

What is the right thing to do after one receives Holy Communion? To kneel or to sit down?

Full Question

Our pastor sits after Communion while deacons are consuming the rest of the Precious Blood and tells congregation to sit too. Should we?
Answer

. The General Instruction of the Roman Missal states:

. . . as circumstances allow, they may sit or kneel while the period of sacred silence after Communion is observed (43).

In 2003, the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments said the following about GIRM #43:

The [intention] is that that the prescription of the Institutio Generalis Missalis Romani, no. 43, is intended, on one hand, to ensure within broad limits a certain uniformity of posture within the congregation for the various parts of the celebration of the Holy Mass, and on the other, to not regulate posture rigidly in such a way that those who wish to kneel or sit would no longer be free (Prot. N. 855/03/L).

This simply means, although uniformity of posture is good but individuals shouldn’t feel they must kneel or they must sit after communion, its up to personal preference. You are free to make your choice of posture from the moment you return (after receiving communion) until the prayer after communion, during which you have to stand with the congregation

5 Myths About The Holy Eucharist That Too Many People Still Believe (Maybe Even You!)

5 Myths About The Holy Eucharist That Too Many People Still Believe (Maybe Even You!)

5 Myths About the Holy Eucharist that Too Many People Still Believe (Maybe Even You!)
     


Corpus Christi
is a special feast each year to especially commemorate the dogma of the real presence of Christ in the Eucharist. Since the Eucharist is Christ himself, the Eucharist is at the center of our Christian faith!
Which is why it’s unfortunate there are so many misconceptions about it. 
Here are 5 common myths:


Myth 1: The Eucharist is just a symbol.


Truth: Of course, there is symbolic value in our spiritual food coming to us in the form of bread and wine. But the Eucharist is not just a symbol. The Eucharist is Jesus himself!

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The Mysterious Story Of St. Faustina And The Flying Eucharist!

The Mysterious Story Of St. Faustina And The Flying Eucharist!


The Mysterious Story of St. Faustina vs. the Flying Eucharist.


    Previously, we shared St. Faustina’s beautiful Litany to the Blessed Host. Today we’re sharing the story of a unique and mysterious Eucharistic miracle she experienced.
St. Faustina was one of the great mystics of the 20th century, and she recorded her amazing regular supernatural experiences in her diary. In a passage dated to the late 1920s, she shares a number of fascinating stories about her personal encounters with Jesus Christ, both in apparitions and in the Eucharist. One amazing story stands out that took place while she was praying in her convent’s chapel.
“One day Jesus said to me, ‘I am going to leave this house,” the diary reads. “Because there are things here which displease Me.’” (Diary, 44ff)
Then something strange happened: the Eucharist left the tabernacle on its own and flew to her! “And the Host came out of the tabernacle and came to rest in my hand…”
If this were you, what would you do in this situation? The Blessed Eucharist – which is Christ’s body, blood, soul, and divinity – has just miraculously started moving around the room and landed in your hand. Would you be scared? Confused? Would you just freeze?
Well here’s how the saint responded: “I, with joy, placed it back in the tabernacle.”
But the Eucharist kept moving. “This was repeated a second time, and I did the same thing. Despite this, it happened a third time…”
After the third time, though, something new happened: “…the Host was transformed into the living Lord Jesus, who said to me, ‘I will stay here no longer!’”
Now, Jesus has told her twice that he wants to leave, and she has prevented him multiple times. After this second declaration, wouldn’t you think a saint would relent?
Not this saint! She confidently told Our Lord that she just wouldn’t let him leave the convent. She explains:
“At this, a powerful love for Jesus rose up in my soul, I answered, ‘And I, I will not let You leave this house, Jesus! And again Jesus disappeared while the Host remained in my hands. Once again I put it back in the chalice and closed it up in the tabernacle.”
This time, it was Jesus who relented. “And Jesus stayed with us.”
But the polish nun didn’t leave it at that. Jesus had said he had wanted to leave due to “things here which displease me.” So, in a very saintly manner, she took it on herself to try to atone for the problems: “I undertook to make three days of adoration by way of reparation.”
And that’s all she says about the encounter. What an incredible story of a wonderfully personal and intimate encounter with Our Lord!
St. Faustina, please pray for us!

Source:


Diary Of St. Faustina, ‘Divine Mercy In My Soul’.

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Courageous Seminarian Who Saved The Eucharist From ISIS Desecration, Returns As A Priest.

Courageous Seminarian Who Saved The Eucharist From ISIS Desecration, Returns As A Priest.

Seminarian who once saved the Eucharist from ISIS returns as a priest.


Martin Baani was just 24 years old when he risked his life as a seminarian to rescue the Blessed Sacrament from the imminent invasion of Islamic State terrorists in his hometown.

Now, he is returning to his native village as a priest, ready to serve the people through the Eucharist.

On August 6, 2014, Baani received a call from a friend who warned that a nearby village had fallen into the hands of ISIS, and that his hometown of Karamlesh would be next.

Baani promptly headed to the San Addai church and took the Blessed Sacrament, to prevent the jihadists from desecrating it. That day, he fled in a car along with his pastor, Fr. Thabet and three other priests.

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