Category: Saints

Prayer to St. Joseph – Never Known to Fail

Prayer to St. Joseph – Never Known to Fail

Prayer to St. Joseph

Remember, O most chaste spouse of the Virgin Mary, that never was it known that anyone who implored your help and sought your intercession were left unassisted.
Full of confidence in your power I fly unto you and beg your protection.
Despise not O Guardian of the Redeemer my humble supplication, but in your bounty, hear and answer me. Amen.

O Great Saint Joseph, you were completely obedient to the guidance of the Holy Spirit. Obtain for me the grace to know the state of life that God in His providence has chosen for me. Since my happiness on earth, and perhaps even my final happiness in heaven, depends on this choice, let me not be deceived in making it.
Obtain for me the light to know God’s Will, to carry it out faithfully, and to choose the vocation which will lead me to a happy eternity.

3 Saints Who Could Levitate (Fly), Bilocate and Bend the Laws of Nature

3 Saints Who Could Levitate (Fly), Bilocate and Bend the Laws of Nature

3 Saints Who Could Levitate (Fly), Bilocate and Bend the Laws of Nature

Saint Joseph of Cupertino

His Superior Ordered Him to Return to Earth. Saint Joseph of Cupertino is the patron saint of air travelers and pilots because he had the ability to levitate and fly through the air.

He was born in 1603 to a desperately poor family who had just lost their home and their sole provider. His mother was a widow at the time of his birth. She also had a quick temper and was prone to angry outbursts.

It would be very safe to say that Saint Joseph of Cupertino had a miserable childhood. It didn’t help that he was a very poor student, and the people of his village considered him retarded.

He did have a great love of God and desired to enter religious life as soon as he was old enough. Rejection was swift at the first two communities he approached. The third, however, accepted him. He was able to complete his studies for the priesthood.

Saint Joseph of Cupertino often levitated as he was saying Mass. These flights above the altar were witnessed by many of the Mass-goers. Sometimes he would also fly around outside.

The gift of levitation in the Catholic Church is generally considered a sign of sanctity. Many other canonized saints were also able to do this.

Saint Joseph of Cupertino is, however, among the first to come to mind when Catholics think of levitation. He is often depicted hovering above an altar.

It has been recorded that this saint would fly dangerously close to candles without the cloth of his religious habit catching fire.

When Saint Joseph of Cupertino journeyed with his religious superior to visit Pope Urban, he, once again, flew into the air and stayed there until his superior ordered him down. Another sign of sanctity for someone in religious life is to obey their superior.

Saint Martin de Porres

Saint Martin de Porres patron of mixed-race people.Many other saints also defied gravity, time and space. Another notable example was Saint Martin de Porres of Lima, Peru. He could fly through the air, as well as bilocate, another gift given to very holy souls, that allows them to be in multiple places at once.
If you are not Catholic and reading this, please understand that many devout Catholics truly believe these miracles happened and they are highly scrutinized by Church authorities. They are outward signs of God working through one of His servants. God exists outside of time and space, and He sometimes allows humans to do the same.

Saint Martin de Porres was of mixed race, born in Lima in 1579. His father was a Spanish aristocrat, and his mother was a former African slave who might also have been part Native American.

Saint Martin’s father was not married to his mother. He and his sister had very low social standing in Lima, as they were poor and considered illegitimate. Eventually, Saint Martin’s father left the family and moved elsewhere.

He had many supernatural gifts

To earn money, Saint Martin learned to cut hair from a local barber before entering a Dominican monastery as a lay servant. Later, he took religious vows and became a brother. He also cut the hair of the other monks.

During his lifetime, Saint Martin practiced extreme austerity. He was exceptionally kind to all and once brought a beggar back to the monastery to care for him.

Very reliable eyewitnesses testified that Saint Martin de Porres was seen doing missionary work in Asia and Mexico, even though he never left Lima.

Because Saint Martin was also given the gift of healing, he worked in the monastery infirmary. It was there that witnesses reported him walking through closed doors to reach the sick. He also healed people on the street and developed a reputation in Lima as a wonder worker.

When my children were young, I bought them a book about Saint Martin de Porres because he is such an interesting example of the graces God can bestow upon one a man or a woman who has found favor in His eyes.

The book contained a wonderful tale of Saint Martin’s overriding compassion and ability to bring peace to all.

Making Peace with Mice

At one point, the monastery was overrun with rodents. But the holy monk was able to work out a deal with the creatures, as the plan was to kill them. He told one mouse to please lead the other mice away from the monastery. Saint Martin de Porres promised to feed them if they complied.

The saint then walked to the far end of the monastery grounds, with the mice forming a line behind him. They never returned to trouble the other monks.

Saint Martin de Porres is the patron saint of barbers and mixed-race people.

Saint Francis Xavier Could Bilocate

Saint Francis Xavier, a Basque Spanish missionary to India and the Far East, is credited with converting countless people to the Catholic faith. He also established a string of churches in India.

Part of the reason, no doubt, he was so successful in his evangelization efforts, is that he was reportedly able to be in multiple places at once. These bilocations happened very frequently and were seen and documented by many eye witnesses.

Saint Francis Xavier also had the gift of healing and performed many other miracles with God’s divine help.

There’s one notable miracle that occurred after his death in 1552. The body of Saint Francis Xavier was exhumed on at least two occasions, and, each time, was found to be remarkably preserved from decomposition, despite the fact it was buried with limestone, which breaks down the flesh.

Saint Francis Xavier, like many other saints in the Catholic Church, was spared from the visible ravages of death when he died. He, and others like him, are known as “incorruptibles.” His intact body now rests at the Basilica of the Born Jesus in Goa, India.

He is the patron saint of numerous entities, including the country of India and foreign missionaries.

VIDEO: The Final Hours of Pope John Paul II and Exhibition of His Personal Belongings

VIDEO: The Final Hours of Pope John Paul II and Exhibition of His Personal Belongings

The Final Hours of Pope John Paul II

Exhibition of Pope John Paul II’s personal belongings in Guadalupe church

Hundreds of Catholics in Mexico City visited relics of Popes John XXIII and John Paul II on Saturday, hours before the scheduled dual canonisation which will elevate both to sainthood. Worshippers applauded, cried and prayed as they walked pass a glass case containing a wax figure of Pope John Paul II wearing a papal robe.

The relics on display include a piece of skin belonging to John Paul II inside a reliquary, the papal robe he used during his first visit to Mexico and a collection of commemorative coins.

The faithful crossed themselves as they walked past a picture of John Paul II, and some even brought framed pictures of him to be blessed by the local clergy.

Miracle of Saint Francis Of Assisi Partially Confirmed by Scientists

Miracle of Saint Francis Of Assisi Partially Confirmed by Scientists


After nearly 800 years, a team of scientists have conducted tests to partially confirm a miracle by Saint Francis of Assisi.

According to tradition, the year was 1224, and the brothers of the Friary at Folloni near Montella, Italy were snowed in from a particularly harsh winter. Unable to leave the friary, the brothers were starving because their food stores had run out. One night, they heard a knock on the door to the church. When they opened it they found only a sack containing bread marked with a lily flower symbol, typically associated with the French monarchy.

Tradition says the sack of bread was brought to the friary by an angel. Saint Francis of Assisi founded the friary, which is why it is believed he was the source of the life-saving bread even though he was in France at the time (thus the reason for the bread being marked with the French lily symbol) For 800 years the brothers guarded the sack. Initially, the sack was used to cover the altar until it began to wear down. The remaining fragments were then stored in a reliquary inside the church.

Associate Professor Kaare Lund Rasmussen from the University of Southern Denmark teamed up with Italian and Dutch researchers to conduct scientific studies on the textile fragments in hopes to verify the claim. Using carbon-14 radioactive dating, they were able to confirm the age of the fragments to between the years 1220-1295, putting its age in line with the harsh winter of 1224.

The team of researchers also conducted tests to verify if the sack contained bread, by testing for the chemical ergosterol. Ergosterol is contained within fungi and protozoa and can be used as a chemical biomarker to indicate the presence of baking and brewing products. From their studies, Rasmussen concluded that:

“Our studies show that there was probably bread in the sack, We don’t know when, but it seems unlikely that it was after 1732, where the sack fragments were immured in order to protect them. It is more likely that bread was in contact with the textile in the 300 years before 1732; a period, where the textile was used as altar cloth – or maybe it was indeed on the cold winter’s night in 1224 – it is possible”

While the team of researchers was able to partially confirm the miracle associated with Saint Francis of Assisi, they stated they cannot confirm scientifically just how it ended up outside the door of the church.

“Scientific measurements cannot prove a legend or belief. What they can do, is either to de-authenticate the object or show accordance between the physical/chemical evidence and the legend.”

Source: ucatholic.com

%d bloggers like this: