Category: Real Testimonies

A Rap Artist Inspiring Story Of How God Called Him To The Priesthood.

A Rap Artist Inspiring Story Of How God Called Him To The Priesthood.

Jihoon Kim 

This guy is amazing!

His name is Jihoon Kim, his stage name is Exflosive. All he ever wanted was to be a professional rapper and music producer. So he was surprised when he first felt God calling him to the priesthood.

“I thought that I was unworthy to be called to priestly vocation,” Kim told ChurchPOP, “and I was scared to accept his calling. However, through a series of prayers and discernments, I was affirmed about my priestly vocation.”

Since entering seminary for the Archdiocese of Los Angeles, he says he’s found true joy and is filled with a deep sense of gratitude.

Which actually brought him back to rap. At seminary, he felt called to share how grateful he is to God with a new song titled “Thank You.”

As you watch it, one thing that comes through particularly strong is the sense that he really believes what he’s rapping, that God really has touched his life in a deep and serious way.

The YouTube video is below, followed by the lyrics. You can also download the song on SoundCloud and follow him on Instagram.

Here’s the music video (lyrics below):

Lyrics to “Thank You” by Jihoon Kim:

Verse 1
I was trapped in the darkness
I couldn’t see where the light is
I was lost in the maze route
I tried to find my way out

My life was pitch black, I was walking through a dark tunnel
I thought I will never see the Sun shine, nocturnal
I felt abandoned but I didn’t ask for help
I said I’m gonna make it through all by myself

But it was pride in disguise
Cuz I wanted no one else to see the pain in my eyes
I kept my head up, but fear resides deep inside
I kept on falling every single time that I tried

So I said this is it, I’m done with it
At any given minute I was gonna call it quit
But I felt the hands picking me up
He told me not to be afraid and lifted me up

Chorus
I thank you for your beautiful love
I thank you for your unconditional love
How can I ever repay the love you’ve been showing me
There is no any other words to say but thank you (x2)

Verse 2
I locked my heart up, I refused to keep it open
In cold blood my heart was frozen
But you brought light to my soul so my ego I let it go
My Lord and my God, I’m here so just let me know

The path that you have planned for me
I will put everything down so put that cross on me
I’m done with paper chasing, you are the one and only
That my heart desires Lord, You showed me

The vision that transcends my finite mind
The eternity that transcends my finite time
That’s why I keep on crying out loud
That you are my Lord and you are my God

You restore to me the gladness of your salvation
You always pour out grace and mercy so amazing
So how can I ever stop praising your glorious name my Lord.

Chorus
I thank you for your beautiful love
I thank you for your unconditional love
How can I ever repay the love you’ve been showing me
There is no any other words to say but thank you (x2)

Verse 3
You lifted me up when I was at my lowest
You gave me hope when I was lost and hopeless
Now that I found you, you are the center of focus
I want everybody in this world to know this

You are the King of kings the Lord of lords
With your heavenly grace you reign over all
I love you God with all my mind, body and soul
I will not stop this even when my body turns cold

Chorus
I thank you for your beautiful love
I thank you for your unconditional love
How can I ever repay the love you’ve been showing me
There is no any other words to say but thank you (x2)

Say a prayer for him and his fellow seminarians!

Source:

ChurchPop

St. Padre Pio And His Friend From Sestri Levante, Italy.

St. Padre Pio And His Friend From Sestri Levante, Italy.


Padre Pio and his friend from Sestri Levante, Italy.

Elide Bellomo – A Testimony.

Elide Bellomo was a dressmaker by trade and lived in Sestri Levante, a resort town not far from Genoa, Italy. When Elide’s aunt became terminally ill, Elide tried to show her as much love and support as she could. Elide’s aunt wanted to be well prepared spiritually when her final moment came. She had always had a fear of death. She showed Elide a holy card of Padre Pio and spoke to her often of him. “Please pray to Padre Pio so that I might have a happy death,” she would frequently say.

Because her aunt spoke so much about Padre Pio, Elide decided to make a trip to San Giovanni Rotondo. She would ask Padre Pio in person to pray for her aunt. Elide knew how pleased her aunt would be to hear of her plan. 

In February 1947, Elide set out for San Giovanni Rotondo. She took a train from Sestri Levante to Foggia and did not arrive in Foggia until the following evening. When the train pulled into the station, she learned that she had just missed the last bus that was going to San Giovanni Rotondo. She would have to wait until the following day for the next bus. She was so disappointed at the news that she began to cry.

Elide was exhausted from the thirty-hour journey. The train had been so crowded that she had to stand for most of the trip. In addition, not anticipating the winter weather, she had not dressed properly. She had been cold and uncomfortable since the time she had left her home.

The station master noticed Elide’s tears and asked her why she was crying. When she explained her frustrations to him, he took pity on her and led her to a small private room in the station. “You can sleep in here for the night,” the station master said. “The chair will be more comfortable to sleep than the bench in the lobby. The stove will keep you warm. I will close the door so that no one will bother you. We will be sure to wake you up early in the morning so that you can catch the bus for San Giovanni Rotondo.”

The next morning, Elide was in better spirits. She boarded the bus and was happy to be on her way. The weather grew colder as the bus approached San Giovanni Rotondo. When the bus dropped her off, it was a two-mile walk through the snow in order to reach the monastery. Elide regretted that she had brought only a light jacket to wear. She also regretted that she was wearing sandals and had no other change of shoes.

The following day, Elide went to Padre Pio’s Mass. After Mass, she waited in line to make her confession. When she heard Padre Pio’s stern voice speaking to a penitent in the confessional, she lost her courage and decided to leave the line. Just as she was preparing to leave, the woman behind her gave her a strong push forward. Soon she was kneeling before Padre Pio. Fear clutched at her heart.

Padre Pio’s voice was very gentle as he talked to her. It reminded her exactly of the way her own dear father used to talk to her when she was a little girl. As a matter of fact, Padre Pio used many of the same phrases that her father had used in days gone by.

Elide told Padre Pio that she had traveled to San Giovanni Rotondo from Sestri Levanti in order to ask for prayers for her aunt. “First make your confession, and then tell me about your aunt,” Padre Pio said. Elide started to make her confession but she could not find her words. Padre Pio helped her through the confession by asking her questions.

After the confession, Elide asked Padre Pio if he would accept her as his spiritual daughter. It was not something that she had planned to say. “Yes, I will accept you,” he answered. Then he asked Elide to tell him about her aunt. Elide told him of her aunt’s fear of death and of her desire to be well prepared when that moment came. Padre Pio listened carefully to all that Elide had to say. When she was finished talking, Padre Pio paused for a few moments of silence. “All will go well for your aunt,” Padre Pio said. He told Elide that she could be assured of his prayers.

Elide left the confessional greatly uplifted. All the inconveniences and hardships of the journey to San Giovanni Rotondo now seemed like trifles. The next day she left to go back to her home in Sestri Levante. A short time later, her aunt passed away. She had just received Holy Communion and was making her thanksgiving when she slipped peacefully into eternal life. It was truly a beautiful death. Elide knew that Padre Pio’s prayers had assisted her aunt.

Meeting Padre Pio had made a great impression on Elide and she looked forward with great anticipation to the time when she could make a return visit. Several months later she was able to make another trip to San Giovanni Rotondo. “You are going to move here permanently,” Padre Pio said to Elide. “When the Home for the Relief of Suffering is completed, you will work there.”  “Oh no,” Elide replied emphatically, “It would be impossible. I am a dressmaker by profession. I have no skills that would enable me to work in a hospital. Besides, my mother needs me. I would never be able to leave her.”

Very gently Padre Pio said to her, “I will take care of your mother myself.” “But if my mother was to get sick, she would want me nearby.” “I will take care of that too,” Padre Pio replied. “You do not have to worry about anything. The hospital is now being built. You will come here and work. It is God’s will for you,” Padre Pio said firmly.

Elide knew that she would never move to San Giovanni Rotondo. It was a small backwater town that had nothing to offer her. Sestri Levante, on the other hand, where Elide made her home, was a lovely seaside resort city on the Mediterranean coast. The weather was mild and agreeable and the coastline was beautiful. Surrounded by her family and friends, Elide was very happy there. She had no intention of moving to San Giovanni Rotondo. She was convinced that only an act of God would cause her to leave her home town.

When Elide returned to Sestri Levante, she began organizing pilgrimages to San Giovanni Rotondo. She wanted others to experience the same blessings that she had experienced while visiting Padre Pio’s monastery. Elide’s pilgrimages became very popular. She took small groups as well as large groups and had no trouble filling the seats.

On one occasion, when Elide was in San Giovanni Rotondo, she got word that her mother was ill. She returned to Sestri Levanti immediately. Fortunately, her mother’s condition had improved by the time she arrived home. 

Her mother had always said that she wanted Elide to be with her at the time of her death. She said to Elide, “I am at peace now. Even if I were to die soon, I feel prepared. I think Padre Pio is calling you to live near him. He needs you to help him with his work. I want you to move to San Giovanni Rotondo and assist him.” Not long after that, Elide’s mother had a beautiful dream. In her dream, Padre Pio was standing at the foot of her bed and he gave her a blessing. She died the very next day.

Elide was deeply saddened by the loss of her mother. She returned to San Giovanni Rotondo and wept as she told Padre Pio about her mother’s death. “What am I going to do now?” Elide said to Padre Pio. “My mother, whom I loved so much, is gone. How will I continue?” “I am now your entire family – mother, father, and brother,” Padre Pio replied. “Your mother is in heaven. We must do our very best so that we too can arrive there someday. Let us concentrate on that.” His words brought her great comfort and great peace.

Elide moved to San Giovanni Rotondo in 1954. Two years later, the Home for the Relief of Suffering opened its doors. Padre Pio told Elide for the second time that she was going to work in the new hospital. “But I can’t,” Elide said. “I don’t have the experience.” Very quietly Padre Pio said to Elide, “Just do what you are told.”

The first day that Elide reported for work at the Home for the Relief of Suffering, she was greeted by a doctor and was given a white coat to put on, just like the one that he had on. The doctor gave her instructions on how to admit the patients and how to fill out the necessary forms and paperwork. Elide was able to learn the job quite easily. After about an hour of instruction, the doctor left her on her own. She found the work very enjoyable.

At the time, Elide was renting a single room, which was located very close to the hospital. A very nice little house became available for rent and Padre Pio told Elide that she should take it. Elide explained to Padre Pio that her salary at the hospital was not enough to cover the monthly rent. “Take the house,” Padre Pio said. “You will always have enough money for your needs with extra left over.” Elide rented the house. As it turned out, Padre Pio had been right. Elide was able to pay the rent each month with money left over.

Elide loved her job as admitting clerk at the Home for the Relief of Suffering. She was happy to be serving Padre Pio’s work. When she was asked to do the washing and ironing for the Capuchins who were in residence at Our Lady of Grace monastery, she gladly accepted the task.

One day, as Elide was doing the laundry for the Capuchins, she had the idea to keep one of Padre Pio’s undershirts. She knew that there were very strict rules in place regarding Padre Pio’s personal items. He was not allowed to give any of his possessions away.

Elide knew that she could get into a lot of trouble for disobeying the rules. But the temptation to keep an article of Padre Pio’s clothing was so great that Elide gave in to her strong desire. One day, she sent the freshly laundered clothing and habits back to the monastery minus one of Padre Pio’s shirts.

The next time Elide went to confession to Padre Pio, she was very nervous. She hoped that he would not guess what she had done and at the same time she knew that it was practically impossible to keep a secret from him.

In the confessional, Padre Pio’s first words to Elide were the words that she did not want to hear. “Have you stolen something that belonged to someone else?” he asked. “It is true,” Elide answered. “What is it that you stole?” Padre Pio asked. “I stole a shirt,” Elide replied. “You stole a shirt? Well, who did it belong to?” Padre Pio inquired. “It belonged to you.” 

At that point, Elide could not contain her emotions any longer and she began to cry. “Well, did you need this shirt that you stole?” Padre Pio asked. “Oh yes, I did need it. I truly needed it,” Elide answered. “Very well then,” Padre Pio said and then he changed the subject. “Now tell me what else you have been doing,” he exclaimed. He never mentioned the “stolen property” to her again. Elide was elated. She was able to keep the prized relic and all thanks were due to Padre Pio.

One morning, Elide was standing outside the church waiting for the doors to open for Mass. Two women who were standing nearby were having a lively discussion and Elide could not help but overhear what they were talking about. “I am going to send my guardian angel to Padre Pio,” one of the women said. “I will ask my angel to take a special message to him.” Elide thought that the talk about guardian angels was ridiculous. The women were obviously superstitious.

When the Mass was concluded, Elide made her confession to Padre Pio. “Will you always assist me?” Elide asked him. “Yes, I will,” Padre Pio replied. “I will always be near you and I will send you my guardian angel to help you.” Elide realized that Padre Pio was trying to show her the error in her thinking. She was sorry she had judged the women in such a harsh way.

Padre Pio’s spiritual children who resided in San Giovanni Rotondo were fortunate to be able to receive Padre Pio’s daily blessing. Often before doing the simplest tasks, like going to an appointment or making a trip to town, they would ask Padre Pio for his blessing.

In the late afternoons when Padre Pio took his recreation in the monastery garden, Elide would sometimes stand outside the garden wall and call to him, “Padre Pio, I am right outside the garden gate here. May I have your blessing?” Padre Pio would then open the gate, make the sign of the cross in blessing over Elide and then close the gate. Very satisfied, Elide would take her leave, usually to go back to her job at the hospital.

Receiving an individual blessing from Padre Pio was curtailed in 1960 with the visitation of Monsignor Carlo Maccari. Monsignor Maccari was sent to San Giovanni Rotondo from the Holy Office in Rome to investigate complaints that had been made against Padre Pio.

There had been accusations in reference to possible financial irregularities at the Home for the Relief of Suffering. There were complaints regarding the unruly behavior in the church on the part of some of the pilgrims. There were complaints about Padre Pio himself. Numerous rumors about him had been circulating for years.

Elide was working at the Home for the Relief of Suffering when Monsignor Carlo Maccari made his visitation. Monsignor Maccari stayed at the Home for the Relief of Suffering during the time of his visit. Much to the dismay of the Capuchin superior at Our Lady of Grace monastery, he took it upon himself to intercept Padre Pio’s personal mail and read it. Even confidential letters were opened and scrutinized. It seemed as though Monsignor Maccari had brought with him certain preconceived ideas and even prejudices against Padre Pio.

Before he returned to Rome, he set forth a number of directives that were to be strictly enforced. People would no longer be allowed to speak to Padre Pio as he was entering or exiting the confessional. The sacristy and the monastery garden became off limits to all members of the laity. A railing was to be built around the women’s confessional to make it more difficult for people to see and to speak to Padre Pio.

Padre Pio never contested the decisions of high church officials in reference to his ministry. He was very much aware that there was open hostility toward him. He would not speak to anyone about Monsignor Maccari’s visit and just as he had done in the past, he followed all of the directives to the letter.

Elide felt very sad about the restrictions that had been put in place as a consequence of the visit of Monsignor Maccari. Like many others, Elide depended on Padre Pio’s daily blessing. Now it seemed as though it would be practically impossible to greet Padre Pio each day and to receive his blessing.

Elide came up with a solution to the problem and she spoke to Padre Pio about it. She told him that when he went to the garden in the afternoon for his recreation period, she would be standing on the other side of the wall. Of course, he would not be able to see her but she would be able to look through the keyhole of the gate and see him.

“I would like you to pause as you pass by the garden gate and give me a blessing,” Elide said to Padre Pio. “I will be waiting there.” Padre Pio was happy to agree to Elide’s request. Elide continued to receive his daily blessing, “through the garden wall” and Padre Pio did not break a single rule in doing so.

On January 30, 1964, Pope Paul VI announced that Padre Pio was restored to full freedom in his priestly ministry. Like many times in the past, it had been a waiting game. The accusations and complaints against him were eventually all shown to be false.

Padre Pio continued to direct his spiritual children step by step on the path toward holiness. Once, Elide’s brother surprised her by giving her a television set as a gift. She was delighted to receive it. When she told Padre Pio the good news about her new gift, he was not at all pleased. “I am sorry that you have invited the devil into your home!” Padre Pio said adamantly. Elide was shocked at his words. However, she could see that he meant what he said. Elide got the message loud and clear and decided to return the television to her brother.

Elide became very proficient as the hospital receptionist and admitting clerk at the Home for the Relief of Suffering. One day without warning, Padre Pio told her that her job was going to be changed. She would become the hospital’s switchboard operator. The hospital had grown and expanded so much that a central switchboard had to be installed.

Elide panicked at the thought of being in charge of a busy switchboard. “But I can’t do that,” Elide said to Padre Pio. “I have no experience. I don’t think I would be up to the task. I am afraid that it would be too difficult.” “I want you to do what I am asking of you,” Padre Pio said. Elide complied with Padre Pio’s wishes and a technician trained her in the work. The ease with which she learned the job convinced her that Padre Pio was assisting her.

After Padre Pio’s death in 1968, Elide continued to live on in the little house in San Giovanni Rotondo, the one that Padre Pio had urged her to rent. The house had a lovely garden in the back which she enjoyed very much. She was very contented there. She eventually retired from her job at the Home for the Relief of Suffering. Padre Pio had assured Elide that her needs would always be supplied.

Time proved the truth of his words. Elide never lacked for anything. She felt blessed that she was able to give the extra money that she had at the end of each month to those who were less fortunate. She truly believed that Padre Pio was watching over her from heaven.

How The Fatima Apparitions Helped Salvador Dali Return To God. 

How The Fatima Apparitions Helped Salvador Dali Return To God. 

Artist Salvador Dali

How the Fatima Vision of Hell helped Salvador Dali Return to God. 

Salvador Dali is considered one of the greatest artists of the 20th century and the most famous Surrealist. At the height of his popularity in 1960, he was commissioned by The Blue Army of Our Lady of Fatima to paint the Vision of Hell, as Lucia, Jacinta and Francisco experienced during the July 13, 1917, apparition at Fatima. The idea for the painting came from a Protestant who, having read about the vision from Sister Lucia’s memoirs, converted to Catholicism and entered the seminary. The thought was that Dali could reach young people and unbelievers far more effectively with this message than any sermon on Sunday morning or story about saints. This commission would change Dali’s life and work, and lead him from his avowed atheism back to his Catholic roots.

Dali grew up in Spain near the border of France in Catalonia. His father was an anti-clerical, atheist and his mother a devout Roman Catholic. Born just nine months after his brother, also called Salvador, who later died, he was often told by his parents that he was his reincarnated brother.

Having to juggle between the influences of belief and unbelief in God, Dali grew up confused and uncertain, stating once, “Heaven is to be found exactly in the center of the bosom of the man who has faith. At this moment I do not yet have faith, and I fear I shall die without heaven.” 

Dali’s fame grew throughout the ‘30s and ‘40s and he became an immediate sensation in the U.S. after his first exhibition there in 1934. His famous painting, The Persistence in Memory, with the image of melting pocket watches, helped define his method of creativity and surrealism, the “paranoiaccritical method.” Dali’s creativity arose from images he drew from the subconscious as he fell into a state of semi-wakefulness, or hypnogogy.

Throughout his life, Dali struggled with the idea of his own death, a fear he could not overcome. He studied new discoveries related to the third dimension, which led him to seek access to the fourth dimension and immortality. His works are permeated with themes of eroticism, death and decay, but also religious themes and subjects related to scientific progress. 

He was 55 when he was approached by The Blue Army to paint the Vision of Hell. Blue Army cofounder John Haffert had received a letter from the seminarian (former protestant, spoken of earlier) encouraging him to approach Dali with the idea. He also put up his life’s savings to pay for it. Haffert met with Dali in the New York hotel where he was staying and told him about The Blue Army’s mission to spread the message of Fatima. He read him the story of Fatima from Lucia’s writings and the description of the Vision of Hell.

“It’s up to you to present this Vision truthfully and vividly,” Haffert told him. “You are being chosen to be Our Lady’s artist. A visual interpreter for God.”

Dali listened intently, then ordered a plate of escargot – (French word for snails) are a delicacy consisting of cooked edible land snails) When it arrived, he began to probe the snails with escargot forks, explaining to Haffert that the great artists always used pitchforks to depict the devils in hell, but he would use escargot forks instead. “The soul of a sinner is like a snail,” he explained. “It curls and cowls up in the shell and the only way to retrieve it is by using an escargot fork!”

Escargot forks

The two of them settled on a commission fee and signed an agreement on a paper napkin. 

Haffert set out to try to get a meeting between Dali and Sister Lucia, who in 1960 was a cloistered Carmelite nun in Coimbra, Portugal. He was not having any success, even after writing to her personally. Dali told Haffert it was no problem. He would study what she said about the Vision and put together his own vision, telling him, “I will paint what I see.”

For over a year, Dali poured over Lucia’s description of the Vision of Hell and searched his subconscious for imagery, to no avail. Haffert suggested he go to Fatima for inspiration. Part of Dali’s problem was he did not know how to present the Blessed Virgin Mary in his painting. His wife, Gala, was always the face of the women in his paintings.

At Fatima, he was brought directly to the spot where the Blessed Mother appeared and where the children saw the earth open revealing hell. The key to understanding the Vision of Hell, he was told by his guide, Canon Jose Galamba de Oliveira, was the appeal for conversion. And the Immaculate Heart of Mary is sign of hope for all who respond to her message of conversion.

Through Galamba’s influence, Dali was finally able to meet with Sister Lucia during this trip. He spent a short time with her, conversing through the bars of the parlor grill. Dali would later comment how special it felt to “breath the same air as a future saint,” like being in a heavenly presence. Dali finally had the inspiration to paint the Vision of Hell.

Before leaving Fatima, Dali asked Canon Galamba to hear his confession. Galamba later told Haffert, it was “the most moving, sincere and profound confession” he had ever heard in his many decades as a priest.

On March 13, 1962, Haffert received notice that the painting was finished and Mr. Dali wanted to present it to him. He was not able to be there at the time, but Msgr. Harold Colgan, Haffert’s cofounder of The Blue Army, went in his stead. From the look on his face when the painting was revealed, Msgr. Colgan was shocked at the Vision according to Dali. It was not what he expected.

However, upon further study and examination, it is believed that Dali portrayed himself in the vision and painted his own conversion. It shows a dying person, his soul translucent red, tortured and tormented by demons in hell who probe him with escargot forks, trying to extract his soul. The fissured earth opens beneath to the place of hell. The Blessed Mother above, in anguish, revealing her sorrowful and loving heart before the horror of a soul being lost. A lone figure holds up a crucifix to heaven in prayer.

A portrait of Salvador Dali ‘s Painting of Hell.

The Fatima children said they would have died of fright at the Vision of Hell, if Mary had not been with them. She told the children, “You have seen hell where the souls of sinners go. To save them, God wishes to establish in the world devotion to my Immaculate Heart.” During the August apparition, she implored them, “Pray, pray very much, for many souls go to hell because they have no one to pray for them.”

No one knows what Sister Lucia said to Dali after his brief visit with her, but she had a knack for saying exactly what someone needed to hear to return to God, including hardened Communists. She must have helped him know the love of God and the Blessed Mother as well, and that her Immaculate Heart is a refuge for sinners. Dali did not use his wife Gala as his model for the face of Mary in his picture. He returned to his Catholic roots and belief in God and faced his mortality.

When Sister Lucia finally saw his painting of the Vision in 1997, she studied it intently, then said to her interpreter:

“Hell is spiritual and not physical, and it is impossible for anyone to make an image of hell. The painting comes as close as humanly possible to representing hell.”

Salvador Dali died of heart failure on January 23, in 1989, at the age of 84. He kept his religious sentiments secret from the world. Sister Lucia must surely have prayed for him.

~Source:

bluearmy.com

How The Fatima Apparitions Helped Salvador Dali Return To God. 

How The Fatima Apparitions Helped Salvador Dali Return To God. 

Artist Salvador Dali

How the Fatima Vision of Hell helped Salvador Dali Return to God. 

Salvador Dali is considered one of the greatest artists of the 20th century and the most famous Surrealist. At the height of his popularity in 1960, he was commissioned by The Blue Army of Our Lady of Fatima to paint the Vision of Hell, as Lucia, Jacinta and Francisco experienced during the July 13, 1917, apparition at Fatima. The idea for the painting came from a Protestant who, having read about the vision from Sister Lucia’s memoirs, converted to Catholicism and entered the seminary. The thought was that Dali could reach young people and unbelievers far more effectively with this message than any sermon on Sunday morning or story about saints. This commission would change Dali’s life and work, and lead him from his avowed atheism back to his Catholic roots.

Dali grew up in Spain near the border of France in Catalonia. His father was an anti-clerical, atheist and his mother a devout Roman Catholic. Born just nine months after his brother, also called Salvador, who later died, he was often told by his parents that he was his reincarnated brother.

Having to juggle between the influences of belief and unbelief in God, Dali grew up confused and uncertain, stating once, “Heaven is to be found exactly in the center of the bosom of the man who has faith. At this moment I do not yet have faith, and I fear I shall die without heaven.” 

Dali’s fame grew throughout the ‘30s and ‘40s and he became an immediate sensation in the U.S. after his first exhibition there in 1934. His famous painting, The Persistence in Memory, with the image of melting pocket watches, helped define his method of creativity and surrealism, the “paranoiaccritical method.” Dali’s creativity arose from images he drew from the subconscious as he fell into a state of semi-wakefulness, or hypnogogy.

Throughout his life, Dali struggled with the idea of his own death, a fear he could not overcome. He studied new discoveries related to the third dimension, which led him to seek access to the fourth dimension and immortality. His works are permeated with themes of eroticism, death and decay, but also religious themes and subjects related to scientific progress. 

He was 55 when he was approached by The Blue Army to paint the Vision of Hell. Blue Army cofounder John Haffert had received a letter from the seminarian (former protestant, spoken of earlier) encouraging him to approach Dali with the idea. He also put up his life’s savings to pay for it. Haffert met with Dali in the New York hotel where he was staying and told him about The Blue Army’s mission to spread the message of Fatima. He read him the story of Fatima from Lucia’s writings and the description of the Vision of Hell.

“It’s up to you to present this Vision truthfully and vividly,” Haffert told him. “You are being chosen to be Our Lady’s artist. A visual interpreter for God.”

Dali listened intently, then ordered a plate of escargot – (French word for snails) are a delicacy consisting of cooked edible land snails) When it arrived, he began to probe the snails with escargot forks, explaining to Haffert that the great artists always used pitchforks to depict the devils in hell, but he would use escargot forks instead. “The soul of a sinner is like a snail,” he explained. “It curls and cowls up in the shell and the only way to retrieve it is by using an escargot fork!”

Escargot forks

The two of them settled on a commission fee and signed an agreement on a paper napkin. 

Haffert set out to try to get a meeting between Dali and Sister Lucia, who in 1960 was a cloistered Carmelite nun in Coimbra, Portugal. He was not having any success, even after writing to her personally. Dali told Haffert it was no problem. He would study what she said about the Vision and put together his own vision, telling him, “I will paint what I see.”

For over a year, Dali poured over Lucia’s description of the Vision of Hell and searched his subconscious for imagery, to no avail. Haffert suggested he go to Fatima for inspiration. Part of Dali’s problem was he did not know how to present the Blessed Virgin Mary in his painting. His wife, Gala, was always the face of the women in his paintings.

At Fatima, he was brought directly to the spot where the Blessed Mother appeared and where the children saw the earth open revealing hell. The key to understanding the Vision of Hell, he was told by his guide, Canon Jose Galamba de Oliveira, was the appeal for conversion. And the Immaculate Heart of Mary is sign of hope for all who respond to her message of conversion.

Through Galamba’s influence, Dali was finally able to meet with Sister Lucia during this trip. He spent a short time with her, conversing through the bars of the parlor grill. Dali would later comment how special it felt to “breath the same air as a future saint,” like being in a heavenly presence. Dali finally had the inspiration to paint the Vision of Hell.

Before leaving Fatima, Dali asked Canon Galamba to hear his confession. Galamba later told Haffert, it was “the most moving, sincere and profound confession” he had ever heard in his many decades as a priest.

On March 13, 1962, Haffert received notice that the painting was finished and Mr. Dali wanted to present it to him. He was not able to be there at the time, but Msgr. Harold Colgan, Haffert’s cofounder of The Blue Army, went in his stead. From the look on his face when the painting was revealed, Msgr. Colgan was shocked at the Vision according to Dali. It was not what he expected.

However, upon further study and examination, it is believed that Dali portrayed himself in the vision and painted his own conversion. It shows a dying person, his soul translucent red, tortured and tormented by demons in hell who probe him with escargot forks, trying to extract his soul. The fissured earth opens beneath to the place of hell. The Blessed Mother above, in anguish, revealing her sorrowful and loving heart before the horror of a soul being lost. A lone figure holds up a crucifix to heaven in prayer.

A portrait of Salvador Dali ‘s Painting of Hell.

The Fatima children said they would have died of fright at the Vision of Hell, if Mary had not been with them. She told the children, “You have seen hell where the souls of sinners go. To save them, God wishes to establish in the world devotion to my Immaculate Heart.” During the August apparition, she implored them, “Pray, pray very much, for many souls go to hell because they have no one to pray for them.”

No one knows what Sister Lucia said to Dali after his brief visit with her, but she had a knack for saying exactly what someone needed to hear to return to God, including hardened Communists. She must have helped him know the love of God and the Blessed Mother as well, and that her Immaculate Heart is a refuge for sinners. Dali did not use his wife Gala as his model for the face of Mary in his picture. He returned to his Catholic roots and belief in God and faced his mortality.

When Sister Lucia finally saw his painting of the Vision in 1997, she studied it intently, then said to her interpreter:

“Hell is spiritual and not physical, and it is impossible for anyone to make an image of hell. The painting comes as close as humanly possible to representing hell.”

Salvador Dali died of heart failure on January 23, in 1989, at the age of 84. He kept his religious sentiments secret from the world. Sister Lucia must surely have prayed for him.

~Source:

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