Category: Motivational

The Seven Capital Sins Of The Internet

The Seven Capital Sins Of The Internet

Satan as depicted in the Ninth Circle of Hell in Dante Alighieri’s Inferno, illustrated by Gustave Doré.

The seven capital sins of the Internet

According to one of the founders of LinkedIn, each social network corresponds to one of the seven deadly sins.

At a conference in 2011, transcribed by the Wall Street Journal and republished recently by The Atlantic, one of the founders of LinkedIn, Reid Hoffman, suggested a theory that would explain the success or failure of social networks: each is related, in more than one way, with one of the seven deadly sins. The suggestion isn’t so crazy: Facebook is vanity, Netflix is sloth, and Tinder—need we say it?—is obviously lust.

The question that Reid Hoffman asked himself is simple: why do the social networks which are, in fact, successful, have so little (or absolutely nothing) to do with good causes or totally real needs?

According to Hoffman, it’s because those causes and needs aren’t sufficiently “sinful.” Robinson Meyer, of The Atlantic, describes possible relationships between the most popular social networks and the seven capital sins.

The question that Reid Hoffman asked himself is simple: why do the social networks which are, in fact, successful, have so little (or absolutely nothing) to do with good causes or totally real needs? According to Hoffman, it’s because those causes and needs aren’t sufficiently sinful.

Lust: According to Dante’s Inferno, lustful souls remain forever trapped in a hurricane that gives them no rest. Tinder users could be having a similar experience: that of sliding their finger to the right in the application, without ever finding someone with whom to start a serious relationship.

Gluttony: Instagram is for gluttons. The mythological character Tantalus was punished in Tartarus, such that whenever he tried to eat or drink, the fruit or water drew away from him; in the same way, when we browse on Instagram, we run into a flood of images shared by foodies depicting meals we cannot eat—at least, not on the screen.

Greed: Dante explains how greedy souls are condemned to fight among themselves forever in hell, throwing immeasurably heavy boulders at each other. According to Meyer, this is like the professional competition you see on LinkedIn.

Sloth: although it is not a social network, Netflix is one of the preferred ways to lose time nowadays—although we call it “procrastination” instead of “laziness.”

In Dante’s fifth circle of hell, the wrathful are condemned to attack each other endlessly, without any of them gaining an advantage over others. Isn’t that an exact description of our arguments on Twitter?

Wrath: in Dante’s fifth circle of hell, the wrathful are condemned to attack each other endlessly, without any of them gaining and advantage over others. Isn’t that an exact description of our arguments on Twitter?

Envy: Basically, envy makes us feel so desirous of what we don’t have, that we end up not appreciating what we actually do have. That’s what Pinterest is for.

Pride: There are varying opinions regarding pride, the worst of all sins, which basically consists in believing that you are essentially better than your neighbor. Hoffman states that pride corresponds to Facebook; according to Meyer, however, Medium (or one of the other blogging platforms) could be pride instead. It’s a way of saying, “I know how to say what you think you know, and I say it better, so go ahead and share my article.”

But if Facebook isn’t pride, then what is it? Vanity or vainglory is unlimited and unfounded confidence in one’s own attractiveness, and an uncontrollable desire to praise it. In Meyer’s opinion, this is what draws people to Facebook: the ability to offer online the best possible version of your own life, carefully editing each of its ups and downs.

 

Source:

The seven capital sins of the Internet by Daniel Esparza for Aleteia.

The Sign Of The Cross And The Virgin Mary Saved 33 Chilean Miners From Death

The Sign Of The Cross And The Virgin Mary Saved 33 Chilean Miners From Death

Five years ago on October 13, the 33 miners who became trapped in a Chilean mine were brought to safety.

(CNN)When Chile’s San Jose mine collapsed on August 5, 2010, people around the world were fixated on the fate of the 33 miners trapped 2,300 feet underground.

The miners would end up spending 69 days below the Earth’s surface before rescuers brought them all to safety. As everyone celebrated the rescue of the 33 miners, many pointed to a higher power — a 34th miner — who they say was with them all along.

In the aftermath of the rescue, those involved have recounted seemingly inexplicable miracles during their time underground and credited God with protecting them. God, many of them say, was the 34th miner.

A comforting presence

Jorge Galleguillos, a miner from Copiapo, Chile, recalled making the sign of the cross in front of an image of the Virgin Mary that had been placed near the entrance to the mine. The miners asked her for protection every shift before descending into the lower levels of the mine.
The day of the collapse, like any other day, Galleguillos paid his respects to the Virgin Mary and headed into the mine.
During this particular shift, Galleguillos said he heard warning cracks but continued working. He recalled seeing something like a “white species … a butterfly” falling diagonally in the mine “like a paper.”

It was likely a bit of white quartz, but in local culture, a white animal is a sign that God is present.
As the mine began to rumble and dust filled the air, Galleguillos said he envisioned his 6-day-old grandson in his arms and his mother standing in front of him.
“I am not going to see my mother again. I’m not going to meet my grandson,” he thought.
Galleguillos said he is not particularly religious. Still, even as it seemed the worst was ahead, he said he felt God’s presence.
In the five years since the mine collapse, Galleguillos said he is more thankful than ever.
“There aren’t words to continue thanking God enough,” he told CNN’s Rosa Flores in a recent interview.

A rationing of resources

Alex Vega, a second-generation miner, had been suffering from a gastric ulcer for a couple of months when the miners became trapped.
As always, he had his pills in his backpack. Three of them. He divided them into four parts each so he could take a piece each day.
The fact that there was very little food only made his symptoms worse, and at this point, they had no idea when or if they would be rescued.
The miners ate one can of tuna per day, splitting each can between the 33 of them.
“You have to have faith,” Galleguillos said. “You can never lose your faith. Faith is nourishment … Faith is life.”

Faith, even without hope

Shift foreman Luis Urzua was the first person to be heard once verbal contact was made with the miners. His first words were, “We are well and hoping that you will rescue us.”
Urzua said he doesn’t believe in luck, but he does believe in faith — even when it seems like there is no hope.
“The devil couldn’t do anything because God was present,” he said.
Urzua recounted a time in the mine when one of his colleagues became ill. The prayers of the other miners, Urzua said, healed him.
“We made a prayer, we prayed in front of him,” he said. “The next day, he was better. … He was doing better than all of us.”
That power of prayer stayed with the miners throughout their time underground.
“When we prayed, we didn’t pray to get rescued; we prayed for the people outside not to abandon us,” he said.
It was another answered prayer.

Rescue resumes inexplicably

After weeks of drilling, the rescuers were getting closer to the miners. Then, the drill halted, just feet from reaching the miners. There was no forward or backward motion.
“It’s like, did we come this far and go through all this? And this damn thing is stuck here,” said Richard Soppe, a manager with Center Rock Inc.
Then, without any effort from the rescuers, there was a pop, and it started moving again.
Brandon Fisher, owner of Center Rock, led a team of drilling experts to help free the miners.
“I remember there was a loud bang on the backside of the control panel,” Fisher said. “Everyone just kind of stopped at one point in time and looked around.”

“We still don’t know what that noise was,” he said.
Ariel Ticona, a miner and expectant father at the time, said that when he heard the drill bit break through, he knew “that was by the hand of God that the miracle was done.”
While trapped, Ticona became a father to a baby girl, Esperanza, which means hope.
Jonathan Franklin, author of “33 Men: Inside the Miraculous Survival and Dramatic Rescue of the Chilean Miners,” said Esperanza’s birth was a miracle because she gave hope to the miners. She gave their dream of rescue a face.

Rescuing the miners

Chilean miner Osman Araya is welcomed by his wife, Angelica, after being rescued from the San Jose mine on October 13, 2010.
After much preparation and prayer, the final leg of the rescue began.
Florencio Avalos was the first miner to emerge. He was pulled to the surface in a 22-inch wide capsule.
Celebrations broke out, but the rescuers and miners faced the reality that 32 more miners needed the same miracle to live.
One after the other, they were rescued.
Vega said he hugged and kissed his wife like he was never going to let her go.
Ticona met his new daughter Esperanza in the hospital.

Urzua said God saved all 33 miners for a reason, but he’s been asking himself why since the rescue.
“Today, everywhere we turn, there is misery, hunger, terrible natural events,” Urzua said, speculating about God’s motive to rescue them. “We have to care for our environment, care for our children, so that they have a better life, we give them the best.”

After the rescuers returned home, they studied the science of the rescue.
“These tools should not have been able to bend and go around some of these curves. I mean, there’s no question in my mind that the faith of God, and the faith of the world praying for these guys to get rescued was a huge factor,” Fisher said. “Science, know-how, and will were applied, but at the end of the day, the big guy had everything to do with this rescue being successful. I believe that wholeheartedly.”

credit: thesplendorofthechurch

A Strong Catholic Prayer in Your Time of Financial Difficulties

A Strong Catholic Prayer in Your Time of Financial Difficulties

 

A Strong Catholic Prayer in Your Time of Financial Difficulties

 
These prayers in times of financial difficulties can serve as a reminder that, although, in the words of a Cyndi Lauper song “money changes everything,” in our faith, it isn’t the only thing that matters, not by a long shot!

Dear Lord,

Help me find firm ground in this shaky economy.

As I seek work and assistance,

Give me strength not to be anxious when I seem to be going nowhere;

Give me patience not to despair when things look bleak;

Give me serenity to know you are here with me, helping me to carry my crosses each day;

So that I may do Your will,

For the salvation of souls

And my Eternal Life.

Keep me calm when tempers flare up;

Keep me sane in a crazy world;

Keep me focused on the houses in Heaven

rather than the houses of cards collapsing around me;

Keep my eyes focused on the prize of Heaven

and not lose hope in You in this world or in the world to come;

Make me compassionate in dealing with others;

Let me see my travails as carrying my cross and sharing in Your Passion, for the love of You and for the salvation of souls, including mine.

And may all my difficulties be ultimately for my good and Your glory.

Amen.

 

Our Father

Our Father, Who art in Heaven, hallowed be Thy name; Thy Kingdom come, Thy will be done on earth as it is in Heaven. Give us this day our daily bread; and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

 

Hail Mary

Hail Mary full of Grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed are thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb Jesus. Holy Mary Mother of God, pray for us sinners now and at the hour of our death Amen.

Glory Be

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

10 Popular Things Catholics Are Tired of Hearing (and How to Respond )

10 Popular Things Catholics Are Tired of Hearing (and How to Respond )

Despite the many stereotypes that hang over our faith, the important thing to remember is our Church has stood the test of time and remained for more than 2,000 years.

Below are 10 popular things every Catholic is tired of hearing

1. Catholics worship statues

This stereotype is painful to hear. Not only is this completely false, but it is ludicrous. Despite the fact that there are 801 million Protestants worldwide, according to the Pew Research Center, my rant will be geared towards our brothers and sisters in the United States. In this country, approximately 51.5% of people are Protestant Christians.

Realistically, most of these families have pictures in their home, which is completely normal, right? Right. They have pictures of their loved ones, both living and deceased. Is it not hypocritical then to say that Catholics are idol worshipers when these families have portraits of their loved ones on the walls? If these Protestant families can have pictures of Uncle Bernie and Mawmaw hanging on the wall, then most certainly the Church can present pictures of our beloved Jesus, his disciples, and the saints.

2. Catholics pray to Mary instead of God

This is a very common misconception throughout the Protestant community, and while I can understand why it is, I am also disheartened that many jump to such a harsh conclusion of the Catholic faith.

We don’t pray to Mary, we ask her to pray for us, just as a Protestant asks their deceased grandparent/parent to watch over them.

3. The saints can’t hear your prayers because they are dead.

I beg to differ. Since when is anyone who is in Heaven considered dead? We call it the afterlife for a reason. In fact, there is biblical proof that the saints can hear our prayer

-Revelation: 5:8 “And when he had taken it, the four living creatures and the twenty-four elders fell down before the Lamb. Each one had a harp and they were holding golden bowls full of incense, which are the prayers of God’s people.”

-Revelation 8:3-4 “Another angel, who had a golden censer, came and stood at the altar. He was given much incense to offer, with the prayers of all God’s people, on the golden altar in front of the throne. The smoke of the incense, together with the prayers of God’s people, went up before God from the angel’s hand.”

4. Mother Mary isn’t important; she’s just like anyone else

If our Blessed Mother isn’t important, then every female would have had an immaculate conception. For this reason, that is why the declarative statement above doesn’t make sense. Of course, Mother Mary is important, she gave birth to our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ.

What is so amazing about the Catholic faith is the fact that we recognize the importance of Mary, and we honour her accordingly. She is a role model and saint for all Christians to look up to because she submitted to God completely.

Until the day another woman gives birth to Jesus, no one will ever be just like Mary. She is a very special, holy woman.

5. Catholics made up all their rules

Every single tradition we have in the Catholic Church, namely during Mass, has biblical roots. Not to mention the fact that Jesus was the founder of our Church. I don’t know about you, but Jesus doesn’t make mistakes.

6. God said to confess sins to Him, not a priest

This one is a personal favourite of mine. Drum roll, please.

-James 5:16 “Therefore, confess your sins to one another, and pray for one another so that you may be healed. The effective prayer of a righteous man can accomplish much.”

It is true that we pray directly to God, and ask Him to forgiveness, however for sins(mortal) we do as Jesus commands and confess it to one another (our priests). Jesus said this directly to his disciples, so through Him, they were able to forgive sins. This power passed down to every priest, and so on and so forth. That felt good.

7. Catholicism is a cult

Jesus Christ founded this Church more than 2,000 years ago, I would hardly call it a cult.

8. Catholics aren’t Christians

The word Christian is associated with anyone who follows Christ’s teachings, and since the Catholic Church does just that then we are to be called Christians. Not to mention Catholics were actually the first Christians.

9. Catholics added books to the Holy Bible.

This one is so hilarious it hurts. For 300 years there was no Bible, only random writings from the prophets like St.Peter etc, until the Catholic monks compiled and canonized what is now known today as the Holy Bible. (That is until the Protestant Reformation occurred, in which one man *Martin Luther* removed 7 books). Ouch.

10. Catholics believe you can pay your way into Heaven

We definitely do not. That is a huge misconception which occurred during the Protestant Reformation.

Despite the many stereotypes that hang over our faith, the important thing to remember is our Church has stood the test of time and remained for more than 2,000 years.

Whether you are Catholic or Protestant– we are all followers of Christ, and He is the ultimate goal.

Source: rcatholics.com

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