Category: Church

Here Are 5 Gift Ideas For Children Who Just Received Their First Holy Communion 

Here Are 5 Gift Ideas For Children Who Just Received Their First Holy Communion 

First COMMUNION IS A DAY WORTH COMMEMORATING WITH SOMETHING SPECIAL.

BELOW ARE FIVE GIFT IDEAS FOR COMMUNION:

1.) The Action Bible: explained by a Marvel and DC comic artist, The Action Bible brings the stories of the Bible to life in a way that is captivating to young children. Moms of boys, in particular, speak to it being a favorite and most well-used gift from their sons’ first communions. The cost is close to $16.

2.) Lego Rosary: Rosaries are well known first communion gifts because they are so clearly necessary for the situation. The only issue is many Catholic children already have more than one rosary. A fun option they are less likely to already own is the Lego Rosary ($23). Gift givers can go the extra mile by having it blessed before it is given to the first communicant.

3.) MagnifiKid Subscription: Here’s a truism about kids: They love getting mail. MagnifiKid is a great monthly publication that involves comics, coloring pages, and other activities that invite children into a greater comprehension of their faith. At around $35 for a yearly subscription, it is an economical gift that serves as a monthly reminder of the life first communicants are more fully embracing.

4.) Nativity Pieces: Many families gift their children with a few nativity pieces for every sacrament so that by adulthood they will have a full set that has been with them since the starting. Prices vary on nativity pieces, but even buying from a more costly set piecemeal makes this gift recommendation an affordable option that can be built on for years to come.

5.) Personalized Religious Gifts: Anything personalized with the child’s name and date of their first communion is a wonderful way to commemorate the day, as is a patron saint medal. Popular choices of personalized items include Bibles, keepsake boxes, jewelry, bookmarks, and picture frames while popular patron saint medals include St. Michael, St. Christopher, and the Children’s Four-Way Medal.

First communion is a big day. Celebrating the sacrament with family, friends, cake, and gifts is all part of a special time in children’s lives. Gifts that speak to their specific engagement with the sacrament will be the most meaningful and loved, but after the sacrament itself, just being there and sharing in the moment is the best gift a child can receive.

List Of Popes (33 A.D – 2013)

List Of Popes (33 A.D – 2013)

 
List of POPES (33 A.D. – 2013).

1. St. Peter (33-67).

2. St. Linus (67-76)

3. St. Anacletus (Cletus) (76-88)

4. St. Clement I (88-97)

5. St. Evaristus (97-105)

6. St. Alexander I (105-115)

7. St. Sixtus I (115-125)

8. St. Telesphorus (125-136)

9. St. Hyginus (136-140)

10. St. Pius I (140-155)

11. St. Anicetus (155-166)

12. St. Soter (166-175)

13. St. Eleutherius (175-189)

14. St. Victor I (189-199)

15. St. Zephyrinus (199-217)

16. St. Callistus I (217-222).

*Callistus and the following three popes were opposed by St. Hippolytus, antipope (217-236).

17. St. Urban I (222-230)

18. St. Pontain (230-235)

19. St. Anterus (235-236)

20. St. Fabian (236-250)

21. St. Cornelius (251-253)

*Opposed by Novatian, antipope (251).

22. St. Lucius I (253-254)

23. St. Stephen I (254-257)

24. St. Sixtus II (257-258)

25. St. Dionysius (260-268)

26. St. Felix I (269-274)

27. St. Eutychian (275-283)

28. St. Caius (283-296)

29. St. Marcellinus (296-304)

30. St. Marcellus I (308-309)

31. St. Eusebius (309-310)

32. St. Miltiades (311-314)

33. St. Sylvester I (314-335)

34. St. Marcus (336)

35. St. Julius I (337-352)

36. Liberius (352-366) 

*Opposed by Felix II, antipope (355-365).

37. St. Damasus I (366-84) 

*Opposed by Ursicinus, antipope (366-367).

38. St. Siricius (384-399)

39. St. Anastasius I (399-401)

40. St. Innocent I (401-417)

41. St. Zosimus (417-418)

42. St. Boniface I (418-422) 

*Opposed by Eulalius, antipope (418-419).

43. St. Celestine I (422-432)

44. St. Sixtus III (432-440)

45. St. Leo I (the Great) (440-461)

46. St. Hilarius (461-468)

47. St. Simplicius (468-483)

48. St. Felix III (II) (483-492)

49. St. Gelasius I (492-496)

50. Anastasius II (496-498)

51. St. Symmachus (498-514).

Opposed by Laurentius, antipope (498-501).

52. St. Hormisdas (514-523)

53. St. John I (523-526)

54. St. Felix IV (III) (526-530)

55. Boniface II (530-532).

Opposed by Dioscorus, antipope (530).

56. John II (533-535)

57. St. Agapetus I (535-536)

58. St. Silverius (536-537)

59. Vigilius (537-555)

60. Pelagius I (556-561)

61. John III (561-574)

62. Benedict I (575-579)

63. Pelagius II (579-590)

64. St. Gregory I (the Great) (590-604)

65. Sabinian (604-606)

66. Boniface III (607)

67. St. Boniface IV (608-615)

68. St. Deusdedit (Adeodatus I) (615-618)

69. Boniface V (619-625)

70. Honorius I (625-638)

71. Severinus (640)

72. John IV (640-642)

73. Theodore I (642-649)

74. St. Martin I (649-655)

75. St. Eugene I (655-657)

76. St. Vitalian (657-672)

77. Adeodatus II (672-676)

78. Donus (676-678)

79. St. Agatho (678-681)

80. St. Leo II (682-683)

81. St. Benedict II (684-685)

82. John V (685-686)

83. Conon (686-687)

84. St. Sergius I (687-701).

Opposed by Theodore and Paschal, antipopes (687).

85. John VI (701-705)

86. John VII (705-707)

87. Sisinnius (708)

88. Constantine (708-715)

89. St. Gregory II (715-731)

90. St. Gregory III (731-741)

91. St. Zachary (741-752).

*Stephen II followed Zachary, but because he died before being consecrated, modern lists omit him.

92. Stephen II (III) (752-757)

93. St. Paul I (757-767)

94. Stephen III (IV) (767-772).

*Opposed by Constantine II (767) and Philip (768), antipopes (767).

95. Adrian I (772-795)

96. St. Leo III (795-816)

97. Stephen IV (V) (816-817)

98. St. Paschal I (817-824)

99. Eugene II (824-827)

100. Valentine (827)

101. Gregory IV (827-844)

102. Sergius II (844-847).

*Opposed by John, antipope


103
. St. Leo IV (847-855)

104. Benedict III (855-858).

*Opposed by Anastasius, antipope (855)


105
. St. Nicholas I (the Great) (858-867)

106. Adrian II (867-872)

107. John VIII (872-882)

108. Marinus I (882-884)

109. St. Adrian III (884-885)

110. Stephen V (VI) (885-891)

111. Formosus (891-896)

112. Boniface VI (896)

113. Stephen VI (VII) (896-897)

114. Romanus (897)

115. Theodore II (897)

116. John IX (898-900)

117. Benedict IV (900-903)

118. Leo V (903).

*Opposed by Christopher, antipope (903-904).

119. Sergius III (904-911)

120. Anastasius III (911-913)

121. Lando (913-914)

122. John X (914-928)

123. Leo VI (928)

124. Stephen VIII (929-931)

125. John XI (931-935)

126. Leo VII (936-939)

127. Stephen IX (939-942)

128. Marinus II (942-946)

129. Agapetus II (946-955)

130. John XII (955-963)

131. Leo VIII (963-964)

132. Benedict V (964)

133. John XIII (965-972)

134. Benedict VI (973-974)

135. Benedict VII (974-983).

*Benedict VII and John XIV were opposed by Boniface VII, antipope (974; 984-985)


136
. John XIV (983-984)

137. John XV (985-996)

138. Gregory V (996-999).

*Opposed by John XVI, antipope (997-998)


139
. Sylvester II (999-1003)

140. John XVII (1003)

141. John XVIII (1003-1009)

142. Sergius IV (1009-1012)

143. Benedict VIII (1012-1024).

*Opposed by Gregory, antipope (1012)


144
. John XIX (1024-1032)

145. Benedict IX (1032-1045).

*He appears on this list three separate times, because he was twice deposed and restored


146
. Sylvester III (1045).

*Considered by some to be an antipope


147
. Benedict IX (1045)

148. Gregory VI (1045-1046)

149. Clement II (1046-1047)

150. Benedict IX (1047-1048)

151. Damasus II (1048)

152. St. Leo IX (1049-1054)

153. Victor II (1055-1057)

154. Stephen X (1057-1058)

155. Nicholas II (1058-61).

*Opposed by Benedict X, antipope (1058)


156
. Alexander II (1061-73).

*Opposed by Honorius II, antipope (1061-1072).

157. St. Gregory VII (1073-85) 

*Gregory and the following three popes were opposed by Guibert (“Clement III”), antipope (1080-1100).

158. Blessed Victor III (1086-1087)

159. Blessed Urban II (1088-1099)

160. Paschal II (1099-1118).

*Opposed by Theodoric (1100), Aleric (1102) and Maginulf (“Sylvester IV”, 1105-1111), antipopes.

161. Gelasius II (1118-1119)

*Opposed by Burdin (“Gregory VIII”), antipope (1118).

162. Callistus II (1119-1124)

163. Honorius II (1124-1130).

*Opposed by Celestine II, antipope (1124)


164
. Innocent II (1130-1143).

*Opposed by Anacletus II (1130-1138) and Gregory Conti (“Victor IV”) (1138), antipopes (1138).

165. Celestine II (1143-1144)

166. Lucius II (1144-1145)

167. Blessed Eugene III (1145-1153)

168. Anastasius IV (1153-1154)

169. Adrian IV (1154-1159)

170. Alexander III (1159-81).

*Opposed by Octavius (“Victor IV”) (1159-1164), Pascal III (1165-1168), Callistus III (1168-1177) and Innocent III (1178-1180), antipopes.

171. Lucius III (1181-1185)

172. Urban III (1185-1187)

173. Gregory VIII (1187)

174. Clement III (1187-1191)

175. Celestine III (1191-1198)

176. Innocent III (1198-1216)

177. Honorius III (1216-1227)

178. Gregory IX (1227-1241)

179. Celestine IV (1241)

180. Innocent IV (1243-1254)

181. Alexander IV (1254-1261)

182. Urban IV (1261-1264)

183. Clement IV (1265-1268)

184. Blessed Gregory X (1271-1276)

185. Blessed Innocent V (1276)

186. Adrian V (1276)

187. John XXI (1276-1277)

188. Nicholas III (1277-1280)

189. Martin IV (1281-1285)

190. Honorius IV (1285-1287)

191. Nicholas IV (1288-1292)

192. St. Celestine V (1294)

193. Boniface VIII (1294-1303)

194. Blessed Benedict XI (1303-1304)

195. Clement V (1305-1314)

196. John XXII (1316-1334).

*Opposed by Nicholas V, antipope (1328-1330).

197. Benedict XII (1334-1342)

198. Clement VI (1342-1352)

199. Innocent VI (1352-1362)

200. Blessed Urban V (1362-1370)

201. Gregory XI (1370-1378)

202. Urban VI (1378-1389).

*Opposed by Robert of Geneva (“Clement VII”), antipope (1378-1394).

203. Boniface IX (1389-1404).

*Opposed by Robert of Geneva (“Clement VII”) (1378-1394), Pedro de Luna (“Benedict XIII”) (1394-1417) and Baldassare Cossa (“John XXIII”) (1400-1415), antipopes.

204. Innocent VII (1404-1406).

*Opposed by Pedro de Luna (“Benedict XIII”).

(1394-1417) and Baldassare Cossa (“John XXIII”) (1400-1415), antipopes.

205. Gregory XII (1406-1415) Opposed by Pedro de Luna (“Benedict XIII”) (1394-1417), Baldassare Cossa (“John XXIII”) (1400-1415), and Pietro Philarghi (“Alexander V”) (1409-1410), antipopes


206
. Martin V (1417-1431)

207. Eugene IV (1431-1447).

*Opposed by Amadeus of Savoy (“Felix V”), antipope (1439-1449).

208. Nicholas V (1447-1455)

209. Callistus III (1455-1458)

210. Pius II (1458-1464)

211. Paul II (1464-1471)

212. Sixtus IV (1471-1484)

213. Innocent VIII (1484-1492)

214. Alexander VI (1492-1503)

215. Pius III (1503)

216. Julius II (1503-1513)

217. Leo X (1513-1521)

218. Adrian VI (1522-1523)

219. Clement VII (1523-1534)

220. Paul III (1534-1549)

221. Julius III (1550-1555)

222. Marcellus II (1555)

223. Paul IV (1555-1559)

224. Pius IV (1559-1565)

225. St. Pius V (1566-1572)

226. Gregory XIII (1572-1585)

227. Sixtus V (1585-1590)

228. Urban VII (1590)

229. Gregory XIV (1590-1591)

230. Innocent IX (1591)

231. Clement VIII (1592-1605)

232. Leo XI (1605)

233. Paul V (1605-1621)

234. Gregory XV (1621-1623)

235. Urban VIII (1623-1644)

236. Innocent X (1644-1655)

237. Alexander VII (1655-1667)

238. Clement IX (1667-1669)

239. Clement X (1670-1676)

240. Blessed Innocent XI (1676-1689)

241. Alexander VIII (1689-1691)

242. Innocent XII (1691-1700)

243. Clement XI (1700-1721)

244. Innocent XIII (1721-1724)

245. Benedict XIII (1724-1730)

246. Clement XII (1730-1740)

247. Benedict XIV (1740-1758)

248. Clement XIII (1758-1769)

249. Clement XIV (1769-1774)

250. Pius VI (1775-1799)

251. Pius VII (1800-1823)

252. Leo XII (1823-1829)

253. Pius VIII (1829-1830)

254. Gregory XVI (1831-1846)

255. Blessed Pius IX (1846-1878)

256. Leo XIII (1878-1903)

257. St. Pius X (1903-1914)

258. Benedict XV (1914-1922)

259. Pius XI (1922-1939)

260. Pius XII (1939-1958)

261. St. John XXIII (1958-1963)

262. Paul VI (1963-1978)

263. John Paul I (1978)

264  St. John Paul II (1978-2005)

265. Benedict XVI (2005-2013)

266. Francis (2013 – )

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List Of Popes (33 A.D – 2013)

List Of Popes (33 A.D – 2013)

 
List of POPES (33 A.D. – 2013).

1. St. Peter (33-67).

2. St. Linus (67-76)

3. St. Anacletus (Cletus) (76-88)

4. St. Clement I (88-97)

5. St. Evaristus (97-105)

6. St. Alexander I (105-115)

7. St. Sixtus I (115-125)

8. St. Telesphorus (125-136)

9. St. Hyginus (136-140)

10. St. Pius I (140-155)

11. St. Anicetus (155-166)

12. St. Soter (166-175)

13. St. Eleutherius (175-189)

14. St. Victor I (189-199)

15. St. Zephyrinus (199-217)

16. St. Callistus I (217-222).

*Callistus and the following three popes were opposed by St. Hippolytus, antipope (217-236).

17. St. Urban I (222-230)

18. St. Pontain (230-235)

19. St. Anterus (235-236)

20. St. Fabian (236-250)

21. St. Cornelius (251-253)

*Opposed by Novatian, antipope (251).

22. St. Lucius I (253-254)

23. St. Stephen I (254-257)

24. St. Sixtus II (257-258)

25. St. Dionysius (260-268)

26. St. Felix I (269-274)

27. St. Eutychian (275-283)

28. St. Caius (283-296)

29. St. Marcellinus (296-304)

30. St. Marcellus I (308-309)

31. St. Eusebius (309-310)

32. St. Miltiades (311-314)

33. St. Sylvester I (314-335)

34. St. Marcus (336)

35. St. Julius I (337-352)

36. Liberius (352-366) 

*Opposed by Felix II, antipope (355-365).

37. St. Damasus I (366-84) 

*Opposed by Ursicinus, antipope (366-367).

38. St. Siricius (384-399)

39. St. Anastasius I (399-401)

40. St. Innocent I (401-417)

41. St. Zosimus (417-418)

42. St. Boniface I (418-422) 

*Opposed by Eulalius, antipope (418-419).

43. St. Celestine I (422-432)

44. St. Sixtus III (432-440)

45. St. Leo I (the Great) (440-461)

46. St. Hilarius (461-468)

47. St. Simplicius (468-483)

48. St. Felix III (II) (483-492)

49. St. Gelasius I (492-496)

50. Anastasius II (496-498)

51. St. Symmachus (498-514).

Opposed by Laurentius, antipope (498-501).

52. St. Hormisdas (514-523)

53. St. John I (523-526)

54. St. Felix IV (III) (526-530)

55. Boniface II (530-532).

Opposed by Dioscorus, antipope (530).

56. John II (533-535)

57. St. Agapetus I (535-536)

58. St. Silverius (536-537)

59. Vigilius (537-555)

60. Pelagius I (556-561)

61. John III (561-574)

62. Benedict I (575-579)

63. Pelagius II (579-590)

64. St. Gregory I (the Great) (590-604)

65. Sabinian (604-606)

66. Boniface III (607)

67. St. Boniface IV (608-615)

68. St. Deusdedit (Adeodatus I) (615-618)

69. Boniface V (619-625)

70. Honorius I (625-638)

71. Severinus (640)

72. John IV (640-642)

73. Theodore I (642-649)

74. St. Martin I (649-655)

75. St. Eugene I (655-657)

76. St. Vitalian (657-672)

77. Adeodatus II (672-676)

78. Donus (676-678)

79. St. Agatho (678-681)

80. St. Leo II (682-683)

81. St. Benedict II (684-685)

82. John V (685-686)

83. Conon (686-687)

84. St. Sergius I (687-701).

Opposed by Theodore and Paschal, antipopes (687).

85. John VI (701-705)

86. John VII (705-707)

87. Sisinnius (708)

88. Constantine (708-715)

89. St. Gregory II (715-731)

90. St. Gregory III (731-741)

91. St. Zachary (741-752).

*Stephen II followed Zachary, but because he died before being consecrated, modern lists omit him.

92. Stephen II (III) (752-757)

93. St. Paul I (757-767)

94. Stephen III (IV) (767-772).

*Opposed by Constantine II (767) and Philip (768), antipopes (767).

95. Adrian I (772-795)

96. St. Leo III (795-816)

97. Stephen IV (V) (816-817)

98. St. Paschal I (817-824)

99. Eugene II (824-827)

100. Valentine (827)

101. Gregory IV (827-844)

102. Sergius II (844-847).

*Opposed by John, antipope


103
. St. Leo IV (847-855)

104. Benedict III (855-858).

*Opposed by Anastasius, antipope (855)


105
. St. Nicholas I (the Great) (858-867)

106. Adrian II (867-872)

107. John VIII (872-882)

108. Marinus I (882-884)

109. St. Adrian III (884-885)

110. Stephen V (VI) (885-891)

111. Formosus (891-896)

112. Boniface VI (896)

113. Stephen VI (VII) (896-897)

114. Romanus (897)

115. Theodore II (897)

116. John IX (898-900)

117. Benedict IV (900-903)

118. Leo V (903).

*Opposed by Christopher, antipope (903-904).

119. Sergius III (904-911)

120. Anastasius III (911-913)

121. Lando (913-914)

122. John X (914-928)

123. Leo VI (928)

124. Stephen VIII (929-931)

125. John XI (931-935)

126. Leo VII (936-939)

127. Stephen IX (939-942)

128. Marinus II (942-946)

129. Agapetus II (946-955)

130. John XII (955-963)

131. Leo VIII (963-964)

132. Benedict V (964)

133. John XIII (965-972)

134. Benedict VI (973-974)

135. Benedict VII (974-983).

*Benedict VII and John XIV were opposed by Boniface VII, antipope (974; 984-985)


136
. John XIV (983-984)

137. John XV (985-996)

138. Gregory V (996-999).

*Opposed by John XVI, antipope (997-998)


139
. Sylvester II (999-1003)

140. John XVII (1003)

141. John XVIII (1003-1009)

142. Sergius IV (1009-1012)

143. Benedict VIII (1012-1024).

*Opposed by Gregory, antipope (1012)


144
. John XIX (1024-1032)

145. Benedict IX (1032-1045).

*He appears on this list three separate times, because he was twice deposed and restored


146
. Sylvester III (1045).

*Considered by some to be an antipope


147
. Benedict IX (1045)

148. Gregory VI (1045-1046)

149. Clement II (1046-1047)

150. Benedict IX (1047-1048)

151. Damasus II (1048)

152. St. Leo IX (1049-1054)

153. Victor II (1055-1057)

154. Stephen X (1057-1058)

155. Nicholas II (1058-61).

*Opposed by Benedict X, antipope (1058)


156
. Alexander II (1061-73).

*Opposed by Honorius II, antipope (1061-1072).

157. St. Gregory VII (1073-85) 

*Gregory and the following three popes were opposed by Guibert (“Clement III”), antipope (1080-1100).

158. Blessed Victor III (1086-1087)

159. Blessed Urban II (1088-1099)

160. Paschal II (1099-1118).

*Opposed by Theodoric (1100), Aleric (1102) and Maginulf (“Sylvester IV”, 1105-1111), antipopes.

161. Gelasius II (1118-1119)

*Opposed by Burdin (“Gregory VIII”), antipope (1118).

162. Callistus II (1119-1124)

163. Honorius II (1124-1130).

*Opposed by Celestine II, antipope (1124)


164
. Innocent II (1130-1143).

*Opposed by Anacletus II (1130-1138) and Gregory Conti (“Victor IV”) (1138), antipopes (1138).

165. Celestine II (1143-1144)

166. Lucius II (1144-1145)

167. Blessed Eugene III (1145-1153)

168. Anastasius IV (1153-1154)

169. Adrian IV (1154-1159)

170. Alexander III (1159-81).

*Opposed by Octavius (“Victor IV”) (1159-1164), Pascal III (1165-1168), Callistus III (1168-1177) and Innocent III (1178-1180), antipopes.

171. Lucius III (1181-1185)

172. Urban III (1185-1187)

173. Gregory VIII (1187)

174. Clement III (1187-1191)

175. Celestine III (1191-1198)

176. Innocent III (1198-1216)

177. Honorius III (1216-1227)

178. Gregory IX (1227-1241)

179. Celestine IV (1241)

180. Innocent IV (1243-1254)

181. Alexander IV (1254-1261)

182. Urban IV (1261-1264)

183. Clement IV (1265-1268)

184. Blessed Gregory X (1271-1276)

185. Blessed Innocent V (1276)

186. Adrian V (1276)

187. John XXI (1276-1277)

188. Nicholas III (1277-1280)

189. Martin IV (1281-1285)

190. Honorius IV (1285-1287)

191. Nicholas IV (1288-1292)

192. St. Celestine V (1294)

193. Boniface VIII (1294-1303)

194. Blessed Benedict XI (1303-1304)

195. Clement V (1305-1314)

196. John XXII (1316-1334).

*Opposed by Nicholas V, antipope (1328-1330).

197. Benedict XII (1334-1342)

198. Clement VI (1342-1352)

199. Innocent VI (1352-1362)

200. Blessed Urban V (1362-1370)

201. Gregory XI (1370-1378)

202. Urban VI (1378-1389).

*Opposed by Robert of Geneva (“Clement VII”), antipope (1378-1394).

203. Boniface IX (1389-1404).

*Opposed by Robert of Geneva (“Clement VII”) (1378-1394), Pedro de Luna (“Benedict XIII”) (1394-1417) and Baldassare Cossa (“John XXIII”) (1400-1415), antipopes.

204. Innocent VII (1404-1406).

*Opposed by Pedro de Luna (“Benedict XIII”).

(1394-1417) and Baldassare Cossa (“John XXIII”) (1400-1415), antipopes.

205. Gregory XII (1406-1415) Opposed by Pedro de Luna (“Benedict XIII”) (1394-1417), Baldassare Cossa (“John XXIII”) (1400-1415), and Pietro Philarghi (“Alexander V”) (1409-1410), antipopes


206
. Martin V (1417-1431)

207. Eugene IV (1431-1447).

*Opposed by Amadeus of Savoy (“Felix V”), antipope (1439-1449).

208. Nicholas V (1447-1455)

209. Callistus III (1455-1458)

210. Pius II (1458-1464)

211. Paul II (1464-1471)

212. Sixtus IV (1471-1484)

213. Innocent VIII (1484-1492)

214. Alexander VI (1492-1503)

215. Pius III (1503)

216. Julius II (1503-1513)

217. Leo X (1513-1521)

218. Adrian VI (1522-1523)

219. Clement VII (1523-1534)

220. Paul III (1534-1549)

221. Julius III (1550-1555)

222. Marcellus II (1555)

223. Paul IV (1555-1559)

224. Pius IV (1559-1565)

225. St. Pius V (1566-1572)

226. Gregory XIII (1572-1585)

227. Sixtus V (1585-1590)

228. Urban VII (1590)

229. Gregory XIV (1590-1591)

230. Innocent IX (1591)

231. Clement VIII (1592-1605)

232. Leo XI (1605)

233. Paul V (1605-1621)

234. Gregory XV (1621-1623)

235. Urban VIII (1623-1644)

236. Innocent X (1644-1655)

237. Alexander VII (1655-1667)

238. Clement IX (1667-1669)

239. Clement X (1670-1676)

240. Blessed Innocent XI (1676-1689)

241. Alexander VIII (1689-1691)

242. Innocent XII (1691-1700)

243. Clement XI (1700-1721)

244. Innocent XIII (1721-1724)

245. Benedict XIII (1724-1730)

246. Clement XII (1730-1740)

247. Benedict XIV (1740-1758)

248. Clement XIII (1758-1769)

249. Clement XIV (1769-1774)

250. Pius VI (1775-1799)

251. Pius VII (1800-1823)

252. Leo XII (1823-1829)

253. Pius VIII (1829-1830)

254. Gregory XVI (1831-1846)

255. Blessed Pius IX (1846-1878)

256. Leo XIII (1878-1903)

257. St. Pius X (1903-1914)

258. Benedict XV (1914-1922)

259. Pius XI (1922-1939)

260. Pius XII (1939-1958)

261. St. John XXIII (1958-1963)

262. Paul VI (1963-1978)

263. John Paul I (1978)

264  St. John Paul II (1978-2005)

265. Benedict XVI (2005-2013)

266. Francis (2013 – )

Isn’t it worth sharing😀?

Post – Synodal Apostolic Exhortation CHRISTUS VIVIT of The Holy Father FRANCIS To Young People And To The Entire People Of God [Chapter 2, Part 2]. 

Post – Synodal Apostolic Exhortation CHRISTUS VIVIT of The Holy Father FRANCIS To Young People And To The Entire People Of God [Chapter 2, Part 2]. 

…continued

CHAPTER TWO 

Jesus Ever Young. 

Mary, the young woman of Nazareth.

43. In the heart of the Church, Mary shines forth. She is the supreme model for a youthful Church that seeks to follow Christ with enthusiasm and docility. While still very young, she accepted the message of the angel, yet she was not afraid to ask questions (cf. Lk 1:34). With open heart and soul, she replied, “Behold, I am the handmaid of the Lord” (Lk 1:38).

44“We are always struck by the strength of the young Mary’s ‘yes, the strength in those words, ‘be it done’, that she spoke to the angel. This was no merely passive or resigned acceptance, or a faint ‘yes’, as if to say, ‘Well, let’s give it a try and see what happens’. Mary did not know the words, ‘Let’s see what happens’. She was determined; she knew what was at stake and she said ‘yes’ without thinking twice. Hers was the ‘yes’ of someone prepared to be committed, someone willing to take a risk, ready to stake everything she had, with no more security than the certainty of knowing that she was the bearer of a promise. 

So I ask each one of you: do you see yourselves as the bearers of a promise? What promise is present in my heart that I can take up? Mary’s mission would undoubtedly be difficult, but the challenges that lay ahead were no reason to say ‘no’. Things would get complicated, of course, but not in the same way as happens when cowardice paralyzes us because things are not clear or sure in advance. Mary did not take out an insurance policy! She took the risk, and for this reason she is strong, she is an ‘influencer’, the ‘influencer’ of God. Her ‘yes and her desire to serve were stronger than any doubts or difficulties’”.[18]

45. Without yielding to evasions or illusions, “she accompanied the suffering of her Son; she supported him by her gaze and protected him with her heart. She shared his suffering, yet was not overwhelmed by it. She was the woman of strength who uttered her ‘yes’, who supports and accompanies, protects and embraces. She is the great guardian of hope… From her, we learn how to say ‘yes’ to the stubborn endurance and creativity of those who, undaunted, are ever ready to start over again”.[19]

46. Mary was a young woman whose heart overflowed with joy (cf. Lk 1:47), whose eyes, reflecting the light of the Holy Spirit, looked at life with faith and treasured all things in her youthful heart (cf. Lk 2:19.51). She was energetic, ready to set out immediately once she knew that her cousin needed her. She did not think about her own plans, but went “with haste” to the hill country (Lk 1:39).

47. When her young son needed protection, Mary set out with Joseph to a distant land (cf. Mt 2:13-14). She also joined the disciples in awaiting the outpouring of the Holy Spirit (cf. Acts 1:14). In her presence, a young Church was born, as the apostles went forth to give birth to a new world (cf. Acts 2:4-11).

48. Today, Mary is the Mother who watches over us, her children, on our journey through life, often weary and in need, anxious that the light of hope not fail. For that is our desire: that the light of hope never fail. Mary our Mother looks to this pilgrim people: a youthful people whom she loves, and who seek her in the silence of their hearts amid all the noise, the chatter and the distractions of the journey. Under the gaze of our Mother, there is room only for the silence of hope. Thus Mary illumines anew our youth.

Young saints

49. The heart of the Church is also full of young saints who devoted their lives to Christ, many of them even to dying a martyr’s death. They were precious reflections of the young Christ; their radiant witness encourages us and awakens us from our lethargy. The Synod pointed out that “many young saints have allowed the features of youth to shine forth in all their beauty, and in their day they have been real prophets of change. Their example shows what the young are capable of, when they open themselves up to encounter Christ”.[20]

50. “Through the holiness of the young, the Church can renew her spiritual ardour and her apostolic vigour. The balm of holiness generated by the good lives of so many young people can heal the wounds of the Church and of the world, bringing us back to that fullness of love to which we have always been called: young saints inspire us to return to our first love (cf. Rev 2:4)”

[21] Some saints never reached adulthood, yet they showed us that there is another way to spend our youth. Let us recall at least some of them who, each in his or her own way, and at different periods of history, lived lives of holiness.

51. In the third century, Saint Sebastian was a young captain of the Praetorian Guard. It is said that he spoke constantly of Christ and tried to convert his companions, to the point that he was ordered to renounce his faith. Since he refused, he was shot with arrows, yet he survived and continued to proclaim Christ fearlessly. In the end, Sebastian was flogged to death.

52Saint Francis of Assisi, while very young and full of great dreams, heard Jesus’ call to become poor like him and to rebuild the Church by his witness. He joyfully renounced everything he had and is now the saint of universal fraternity, the brother of all. He praised the Lord for his creatures. Francis died in 1226.

53Saint Joan of Arc was born in 1412. She was a young peasant girl who, despite her tender years, fought to defend France from invaders. Misunderstood for her demeanour, her actions and her way of living the faith, Joan was burned at the stake.

54Blessed Andrew Phû Yên was a young Vietnamese man of the seventeenth century. He was a catechist and assisted the missionaries. He was imprisoned for his faith, and since he refused to renounce it, he was killed. Andrew died uttering the name of Jesus.

55. In that same century, Saint Kateri Tekakwitha, a young native of North America, was persecuted for her faith and, to escape, walked over three hundred kilometres in the wilderness. Kateri consecrated herself to God and died saying: “Jesus, I love you!”

56. Saint Dominic Savio offered all his sufferings to Mary. When Saint John Bosco taught him that holiness involves being constantly joyful, he opened his heart to a contagious joy. He wanted to be close to the most abandoned and infirm of his fellow young people. Dominic died in 1857 at fourteen years of age, saying: “What a wondrous thing I am experiencing!”

57. Saint Thérèse of the Child Jesus was born in 1873. At fifteen years of age, having overcome many difficulties, she succeeded in entering the Carmelite convent. Thérèse lived the little way of complete trust in the Lord’s love and determined to fan with her prayers the fire of love burning in the heart of the Church.

58. Blessed Ceferino Namuncurá was a young Argentinian, the son of the chief of a remote tribe of indigenous peoples. He became a Salesian seminarian, filled with the desire to return to his tribe, bringing Jesus Christ to them. Ceferino died in 1905.

59. Blessed Isidore Bakanja was a layman from the Congo who bore witness to his faith. He was tortured at length for having proposed Christianity to other young people. Forgiving his executioner, Isidore died in 1909.

60. Blessed Pier Giorgio Frassati, who died in 1925, “was a young man filled with a joy that swept everything along with it, a joy that also overcame many difficulties in his life”.[22] Pier Giorgio said that he wanted to return the love of Jesus that he received in Holy Communion by visiting and helping the poor.

61. Blessed Marcel Callo was a young French man who died in 1945. Marcel was imprisoned in a concentration camp in Austria, where he strengthened his fellow prisoners in faith amid harsh labours.

62. The young Blessed Chiara Badano, who died in 1990“experienced how pain could be transfigured by love… The key to her peace and joy was her complete trust in the Lord and the acceptance of her illness as a mysterious expression of his will for her sake and that of others”.[23]

63. May these and so many other young people who perhaps in silence and hiddenness lived the Gospel to the full, intercede for the Church, so that she may be full of joyous, courageous and committed young people who can offer the world new testimonies of holiness…Concluded For Chapter 2, Chapter 3 to appear in next post. 

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