Author: FrancisMary

Worried About Your Children? Say This Prayer To Their Guardian Angels

Worried About Your Children? Say This Prayer To Their Guardian Angels

The world is a dangerous place. When you leave the comforts of your home there is no telling what may happen to you or your children. This has been the case since Adam and Eve and will continue to be so until Jesus comes again.

The good news is that we are not alone.

As the Catechism of the Catholic Church declares, “From its beginning until death, human life is surrounded by [angels and] their watchful care and intercession” (CCC 336). God appoints to each one of us a guardian angel whose mission is to guide, guard and protect. We don’t always see them or sense their presence, but the truth is that they are there, ready and willing to come to our aid.

We just have to ask.

For parents, it is easy to forget that our children have guardian angels and that we can pray to them (through the mediation of our own guardian angel) and invoke their powerful protection over our children. When we can’t physically be there with our children to protect them, it is most appropriate to pray to their guardian angel.

Here is a short prayer that is usually entitled, “A Mother’s Prayer to the Guardian Angels of Her Children,” and is one way that we can quiet our heart and be at peace knowing who is protecting our little ones.

SAY PRAYER

I humbly salute you, O you faithful, heavenly friends of my children! I give you heartfelt thanks for all the love and goodness you show them. At some future day I shall, with thanks more worthy than I can now give, repay your care for them, and before the whole heavenly court acknowledge their indebtedness to your guidance and protection. Continue to watch over them. Provide for all their needs of body and soul. Pray, likewise, for me, for my husband, and my whole family, that we may all one day rejoice in your blessed company. Amen.

What To Do When Holy Communion Falls On The Ground At Mass

What To Do When Holy Communion Falls On The Ground At Mass

The Church’s guidelines in this matter highlight the reality of Jesus’ presence in the Eucharist.

On occasion during the distribution of Holy Communion at Mass, a host will fall to the ground or the precious blood will be accidentally spilled. Whenever this happens, the priest, deacon or extraordinary minister of Holy Communion is instructed to take care that the body and blood of Jesus is treated with the great reverence that it is due.

According to the General Instruction of the Roman Missal, “If a host or any particle should fall, it is to be picked up reverently; and if any of the Precious Blood is spilled, the area where the spill occurred should be washed with water, and this water should then be poured into the sacrarium in the sacristy” (GIRM, 280). The “sacrarium” is a special basin in the room next to the sanctuary that has a drain directly into the ground. In this way the natural elements are returned to the earth in a dignified manner.

This procedure is taken one step further in an older instruction from a document entitled De Defectibus, where it states, “If the consecrated host, or any particle of it, falls on the ground, it should be reverently taken up, and the place where it fell washed and slightly scraped, the dot or scraping being put into the sacrarium.”

The host that falls is normally consumed, though sometimes it is saved in the sacristy and put in a dish of water and once the host has dissolved enough, the water is poured down the sacrarium.

It is often not possible to complete all these steps during the celebration of Mass, so usually a priest will place a white cloth over the spot so that it can be properly cleaned up after Mass.

The reason why the Church goes at such great lengths to care for the proper handling of the Sacred Species at Mass is because the Church firmly believes in the words of Jesus, “this is my body, this is my blood.” As the Catechism of the Catholic Church explains, “By the consecration of the bread and wine there takes place a change of the whole substance of the bread into the substance of the body of Christ our Lord and of the whole substance of the wine into the substance of his blood” (CCC 1376).

With this reality in mind, it is not simply bread and wine that fall to the ground, but the body and blood of our Savior. This belief informs everything the Church does in connection to the Eucharist, recognizing that it is God himself who is present and our response to such accidents should be formed by our personal love of him who created us.

This is not a scrupulous activity, but one filed with tenderness, saddened that our Beloved has fallen to the ground. It is our duty to pick him back up and treat his body and blood with all due reverence.

The “Good Thief” Once Protected Jesus and Mary, Did You Know This?

The “Good Thief” Once Protected Jesus and Mary, Did You Know This?

Does this ancient document show the real reason why Jesus forgave the “Good thief”? Jesus and Mary had met him before

From the Bible:

“One of the criminals who hung there heaped abuse on Him. ‘Are You not the Christ?’ he said. ‘Save Yourself and us!’ But the other one rebuked him, saying, ‘Do you not even fear God, since you are under the same judgment? We are punished justly, for we are receiving what we deserve for our actions. But this man has done nothing wrong.’ Then he said, ‘Jesus, remember me when You come into Your kingdom!’ And Jesus said to him, ‘Truly I tell you, today you will be with Me in Paradise.’” – Luke 23:39-43

Before we begin:

The reason Jesus forgave the Good theif, is because of his infinite mercy and love. He is always willing to save all men who sincerely seek him.

What is the name of St Thief (lol):

Dismas

Luke’s unnamed penitent thief was later assigned the name Dismas in the Gospel of Nicodemus, portions of which may be dated to the 4th century. The name “Dismas” was adapted from a Greek word meaning “sunset” or “death”. The other thief’s name is given as Gestas.

In Syriac Infancy Gospel’s Life of the Good Thief (Histoire Du Bon Larron French 1868, English 1882), Augustine of Hippo said; the thief said to Jesus, the child: ” O most blessed of children, if ever a time should come when I shall crave Thy Mercy, remember me and forget not what has passed this day.” Anne Catherine Emmerich saw the Holy Family “exhausted and helpless”; according to Augustine of Hippo and Peter Damian, the Holy Family met Dismas, in these circumstances. Pope Theophilus of Alexandria (385–412) wrote a Homily on the Crucifixion and the Good Thief, which is a classic of Coptic literature.

Demas

In Coptic Orthodoxy, he is named Demas.[2] This is the name given to him in the Narrative of Joseph of Arimathea.

Titus

The apocryphal Syriac Infancy Gospel calls the two thieves Titus and Dumachus, and adds a tale about how Titus (the good one) prevented the other thieves in his company from robbing Mary and Joseph during their Flight into Egypt. See below:

Number 23 of the Syriac Infancy Gospel:

And turning away from this place, they came to a desert; and hearing that it was infested by robbers, Josephand the Lady Mary resolved to cross this region by night. But as they go along, behold, they see two robberslying in the way, and along with them a great number of robbers, who were their associates, sleeping. Now those two robbers, into whose hands they had fallen, were Titus and Dumachus. Titus therefore said to Dumachus: I beseech you to let these persons go freely, and so that our comrades may not see them. And as Dumachusrefused, Titus said to him again: Take to yourself forty drachmas from me, and hold this as a pledge. At the same time he held out to him the belt which he had about his waist, to keep him from opening his mouth or speaking. And the Lady Mary, seeing that the robber had done them a kindness, said to him: The Lord God will sustain you by His right hand, and will grant you remission of your sins. And the Lord Jesus answered, and said to His mother: Thirty years hence, O my mother, the Jews will crucify me at Jerusalem, and these two robbers will be raised upon the cross along with me, Titus on my right hand and Dumachus on my left; and after that day Titusshall go before me into Paradise. And she said: God keep this from you, my son. And they went thence towards a city of idols, which, as they came near it, was changed into sand-hills.

 

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Story Behind The Hymn, “When I Survey The Wondrous Cross”

Story Behind The Hymn, “When I Survey The Wondrous Cross”

When I survey the wondrous cross
On which the Prince of glory died,
My richest gain I count but loss,
And pour contempt on all my pride.

Forbid it, Lord, that I should boast,
Save in the death of Christ my God!
All the vain things that charm me most,
I sacrifice them to His blood.

See from His head, His hands, His feet,
Sorrow and love flow mingled down!
Did e’er such love and sorrow meet,
Or thorns compose so rich a crown?

His dying crimson, like a robe,
Spreads o’er His body on the tree;
Then I am dead to all the globe,
And all the globe is dead to me.

Were the whole realm of nature mine,
That were a present far too small;
Love so amazing, so divine,
Demands my soul, my life, my all.

Story

When teenager Isaac Watts complained to his father about the monotonous way Christians in England sang the Old Testament Psalms, his father, a leading deacon, snapped back ‘All right young man, you give us something better.’

To Isaac Watts, the singing of God’s praise was the form of worship nearest to Heaven and he went on to argue: ‘It’s performance among us is the worst on earth.’

Young Isaac accepted his father’s challenge and eventually wrote a total of more than 600 hymns, earning him the title ‘The father of English hymnody.’

Even as a child Isaac had shown a passion for poetry, rhyming and such mundane things as everyday conversation. His serious-minded father, after several warnings, decided to spank the rhyming nonsense out of his son. But the tearful Isaac helplessly replied,
‘Oh father do some pity take,
and I will no more verses make.’

However, choirs, congregations and individual Christians rejoice to this day that the young lad did not keep his impromptu promise.

If he had, none of us would have the thrill of singing such all-time favourites as “Oh God Our Help In Ages Past,” “Am I A Soldier Of The Cross” or “Joy To The World.”

As a child, Isaac Watts was sickly and unattractive, yet, even by today’s standards he was clever beyond his years. He began the study of Latin at the age of four, and added Greek when he was nine, French at eleven and Hebrew at thirteen.

At fifteen the young poet turned his talents to the service of the church and the great career in hymn-writing began.

In his hymns Isaac Watts takes the Word of God, of which he must have been a diligent student, and distils it so that all is wisdom, beauty and comfort are set before us with plainness and power. No wonder, then, that C.H. Spurgeon’s grandfather, himself a great preacher, and in the line of the Puritans, would have nothing else but the hymns of Isaac Watts sung in his services.

Isaac Watt’s greatest composition must surely be “When I Survey The Wondrous Cross.”
It has been called ‘The very best hymn in the English language’ and in it Watts, using only 16 lines, paints a soul-stirring picture of the Saviour’s death on the cross coupled with the whole-hearted response of the believer to such amazing love.

As Tedd Smith says ‘It seems to me that Isaac Watts wrote this text as if he were standing at the foot of Christ’s cross.’

How blessed to reflect on the finished work of Christ Jesus, as summed up in those lines:

See, from His head, His hands, His feet,
Sorrow and love flow mingled down;
Did e’er such love and sorrow meet,
Or thorns compose so rich a crown?

And how enriching to be able to voice our reconsecration to the Lord’s service in the words:

Were the whole realm of nature mine,
That were an offering far too small;
Love so amazing, so divine,
Demands my soul, my life, my all.

Bible Verse

Galatians 6:14 “May I never boast except in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ.”

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